Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Beta Glucan in Probiotic Foods

Authors
item Singh, Mukti
item Inglett, George

Submitted to: American Chemical Society Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: September 1, 2005
Publication Date: September 1, 2005
Citation: Singh, M., Inglett, G.E. 2005. Beta glucan in probiotic foods [abstract]. American Chemical Society Abstracts. Paper No. AGFD41.

Technical Abstract: As the probiotic foods are gaining popularity, consumption of yogurt is on the rise. Yogurt is rich in vitamins and minerals but is a poor source of fiber. Beta glucan hydrocolloids from oat bran (C-trim30) contain 32% beta-glucan, and 14% protein. Milk solids in the fluid were adjusted with the addition of skim milk powder. C-trim30 was added to the milk to increase the fiber content by substituting part of the added milk powder. The fortified milk was then inoculated with thermophilic culture containing Streptococcus thermopilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii. Set yogurt prepared after incubation was analyzed for viscosity, whey holding capacity, syneresis, color, and compared to control (no C-trim30). C-trim30 affects the gelling properties differently at different levels. The optimum level of added C-trim30 was determined based on the functional and sensory properties of the set style yogurt.

Last Modified: 9/21/2014