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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Prediction of Dimethyl Disulfide Levels from Biosolids Using Statistical Modeling

Authors
item Gabriel, Steven - UNIV. OF MARYLAND
item Vilalai, Sirapong - UNIV. OF MARYLAND
item Arispe, Susana - UNIV. OF MARYLAND
item Kim, Hyunook - UNIV. OF MARYLAND
item McConnell, Laura
item Torrents, Alba - UNIV. OF MARYLAND
item Peot, Christopher - DCWASA

Submitted to: Journal of Environmental Science and Health
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 12, 2005
Publication Date: November 1, 2005
Repository URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10113/27257
Citation: Gabriel, S.A., Vilalai, S., Arispe, S., Kim, H., Mcconnell, L.L., Torrents, A., Peot, C. 2005. Prediction of dimethyl disulfide levels from biosolids using statistical modeling. Journal of Environmental Science and Health. 40:2009-2025.

Interpretive Summary: Wastewater treatment is an important environmental function that produces biosolids as a byproduct. These solids, after proper treatment in accordance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, can then be applied beneficially to farms, forests, tree farms, and mines due to their returning nutrients and organic matter to these reuse sites. This is especially meaningful due to erosion and loss of organic matter from traditional farming activities. In spite of the beneficial uses of biosolids, certain groups perceive these products adversely. The main argument is that the biosolids are malodorous as well as having other concerns about public health and the water supply. Wastewater treatment plants can be proactive in their management of these negatively perceived aspects by examining the factors that, for instance, lead to malodorous biosolids. In this paper we present several statistical models that predict concentration of dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) released from an advanced wastewater treatment plant. DMDS, along with other sulfur and nitrogen-containing gas compounds, contributes to biosolids odors. These models identify certain ambient and process variables that can be adjusted to proactively decrease this odorant and thus are useful tools in biosolids management at wastewater treatment plants.

Technical Abstract: Wastewater treatment is an important environmental function that produces biosolids as a byproduct. These solids, after proper treatment in accordance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, can then be applied beneficially to farms, forests, tree farms, and mines due to their returning nutrients and organic matter to these reuse sites. This is especially meaningful due to erosion and loss of organic matter from traditional farming activities. In spite of the beneficial uses of biosolids, certain groups perceive these products adversely. The main argument is that the biosolids are malodorous as well as having other concerns about public health and the water supply. Wastewater treatment plants can be proactive in their management of these negatively perceived aspects by examining the factors that, for instance, lead to malodorous biosolids. In this paper we present several statistical models that predict concentration of dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) released from an advanced wastewater treatment plant. DMDS, along with other sulfur and nitrogen-containing gas compounds, contributes to biosolids odors. These models identify certain ambient and process variables that can be adjusted to proactively decrease this odorant and thus are useful tools in biosolids management at wastewater treatment plants.

Last Modified: 9/21/2014
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