Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: An Evergreen Huckleberry Industry Near the Oregon Coast Early in the 20th Century

Author
item Postman, Joseph

Submitted to: Journal of American Pomological Society
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 11, 2004
Publication Date: July 20, 2004
Citation: Postman, J.D. 2004. An evergreen huckleberry industry near the oregon coast early in the 20th century. Journal of American Pomological Society. 58(3):147-151

Interpretive Summary: In 1918, horticulture pioneer and entrepreneur Frank Moll left his city job to establish a homestead in the wilderness near the central Oregon coast. During the next 30 years, Moll collected wild black huckleberry plants (Vaccinium ovatum) and developed a small plant nursery and 2 acre huckleberry plantation. He developed propagation methods for this crop and provided fruit to restaurants, cut stems to florists and nursery plants to gardeners and farmers. His plantation was abandoned after his death in 1960. This paper reports on the re-discovery of Moll's huckleberry plantation and the possibility of recovering improved berry plant selections long thought to have been lost.

Technical Abstract: In 1918, horticulture pioneer and entrepreneur Frank Moll left his city job to establish a homestead in the wilderness near the central Oregon coast. During the next 30 years, Moll collected wild huckleberry plants (Vaccinium ovatum) and developed a small plant nursery and 2 acre huckleberry plantation. He developed propagation methods for this crop and provided fruit to restaurants, cut stems to florists and nursery plants to gardeners and farmers. His plantation was abandoned after his death in 1960. This paper reports on the re-discovery of Moll's huckleberry plantation and the possibility of recovering improved V. ovatum selections long thought to have been lost.

Last Modified: 4/23/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page