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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Regrowth of Herbaceous Riparian Vegetation in Response to Clipping and Environmental Factors

Authors
item Boyd, Chad
item Svejcar, Anthony

Submitted to: Society for Range Management Meeting Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: January 2, 2003
Publication Date: February 2, 2003
Citation: BOYD, C.S., SVEJCAR, A.J. REGROWTH OF HERBACEOUS RIPARIAN VEGETATION IN RESPONSE TO CLIPPING AND ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS. SOCIETY FOR RANGE MANAGEMENT MEETING ABSTRACTS. 2003. V. 56. PAPER NO. 26.

Technical Abstract: Stubble height regulations are frequently used to manage livestock grazing of riparian vegetation. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of stubble height, time of clipping, channel morphology and water table depth on regrowth of herbaceous riparian vegetation prior to the end of the growing season. We used a randomized block design with 4, 4 x 6m study sites on each of 3 first order streams in northern Harney County, Oregon. In June and July of 2000-2003, 40 x 50cm experimental plots were clipped to 5.1 (2 inch), 10.2 (4 inch), or 15.3cm (6 inch) stubble height and paired control plots were left unclipped. Complete treatment sets were located adjacent to the stream and 5 meters from the stream at each site. All plots were clipped to 1cm in October and regrowth was calculated by comparing clipped and control plots. Depth to standing water in the soil profile was determined on a weekly basis using PVC wells. Channel morphological characteristics were determined from surveyed cross-sections and longitudinal data. Preliminary data from 2000-2001 indicate that clipped stubble height and time of clipping impacted height and weight regrowth. A 10.2cm end-of-season (October) stubble height requirement was met by all but the 5.1cm July clipping while a 15.3cm requirement was met by all but the 5.1cm June and the 5.1 and 10.2cm July clipping treatments. Depth to standing soil water did not relate to regrowth dynamics. Final data analysis and conclusions are discussed.

Last Modified: 9/2/2014
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