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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Developing Management Practices to Prevent Or Reduce Flooding Damages in Vegetable Crops

Authors
item Rao, R - UNIV OF FLORIDA
item Li, Y - UNIV OF FLORIDA
item Byran, H - UNIV OF FLORIDA
item Reed, Stewart

Submitted to: Extension Reports
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: December 1, 2003
Publication Date: December 1, 2003
Citation: Rao, R., Li, Y., Byran, H., Reed, S.T. 2003. Developing Management Practices to Prevent or Reduce Flooding Damages in Vegetable Crops. Extension Reports.

Interpretive Summary: The economic impact of vegetable crop production in Miami-Dade County during 1997-98 was $168 million or 46% of the total agricultural output. A near surface ground water table, periods of high rainfall and effects of raising the water table mandated by the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Project (Water Resources Development Act 2000) will result in frequent seasonal flooding. Among the many plant responses to flooding are reduced nutrient uptake, transpiration and photosynthesis, loss of chlorophyll and an increased susceptibility to attack form predators and disease. A project was initiated at the Tropical Research and Education Center in Collaboration with the USDA/ARS, Subtropical Horticulture Research Station to: 1) evaluate management strategies for identifying flood tolerance of various crops, 2) identify effects of flooding on disease, nutrition, photosynthesis and transpiration and 3) assess various foliar sprays to alleviate flooding injury in the selected crops. Plants flooded for 3 days were treated with either fertilizers, growth regulators, or fungicides applied as a foliar spray. Flooding decreased leaf chlorophyll content and hence leaf nitrogen concentration. Nitrogen foliar sprays increased plant biomass and leaf chlorophyll content, however, growth regulators and fungicides did not alleviate flood damage to plants.

Technical Abstract: The economic impact of vegetable crop production in Miami-Dade County during 1997-98 was $168 million or 46% of the total agricultural output. A near surface ground water table, periods of high rainfall and effects of raising the water table mandated by the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Project (Water Resources Development Act 2000) will result in frequent seasonal flooding. Among the many plant responses to flooding are reduced nutrient uptake, transpiration and photosynthesis, loss of chlorophyll and an increased susceptibility to attack form predators and disease. A project was initiated at the Tropical Research and Education Center in Collaboration with the USDA/ARS, Subtropical Horticulture Research Station to: 1) evaluate management strategies for identifying flood tolerance of various crops, 2) identify effects of flooding on disease, nutrition, photosynthesis and transpiration and 3) assess various foliar sprays to alleviate flooding injury in the selected crops. Plants flooded for 3 days were treated with either fertilizers, growth regulators, or fungicides applied as a foliar spray. Flooding decreased leaf chlorophyll content and hence leaf nitrogen concentration. Nitrogen foliar sprays increased plant biomass and leaf chlorophyll content, however, growth regulators and fungicides did not alleviate flood damage to plants.

Last Modified: 4/19/2014
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