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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Efficacy of Ethiprole Applied Alone and in Combination with Conventional Insecticides for Protection of Stored Wheat and Stored Corn

Author
item Arthur, Franklin

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 13, 2002
Publication Date: December 30, 2003
Citation: ARTHUR,F.H., EFFICACY OF ETHIPROLE APPLIED ALONE AND IN COMBINATION WITH CONVENTIONAL INSECTICIDES FOR PROTECTION OF STORED WHEAT AND STORED CORN, JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC ENTOMOLOGY 95(6): 1314-1318. 2003.

Interpretive Summary: Organophosphate insecticides currently registered as protectants of stored grains in the United States are being removed from the market, as a result of new regulatory requirements and the development of insecticide resistance. The insecticide ethiprole is part of a new class of chemicals with low mammalian toxicity but has specific effects on insects, however, there are no tests with this insecticide on stored-grain insects. Tests were conducted in which ethiprole alone and in combination with other insecticides was evaluated for residual protectants for 6 months on stored corn and stored wheat. All treatments involving ethiprole successfully suppressed progeny development of the major internal and external feeders of both commodities for 6 months, regardless of the temperature at which the treated commodities was stored. Data from this project were necessary to predict the residual efficacy of ethiprole on stored grain, and to provide support for potential registration.

Technical Abstract: The insecticidal pyrazole ethiprole, applied at rates of 7.5 and 10.0 ppm either alone or in combination treatments with deltamethrin, piperonyl butoxide, and chlorpyrifos-methyl, was evaluated as a protectant of stored wheat and stored corn. The temperature at which wheat was stored was not significant (P < 0.05) with respect to mortality of exposed insects, all rice weevils were dead after 1 week in all chemical treatments, and no F1 adults were produced. Mortality of red flour beetles was variable among treatments and bioassay month, but survival was not dependent on either chemical treatment or bioassay month and no F1 adults were produced. The temperature at which corn was stored was not significant (P < 0.05) with respect to mortality of exposed insects, however, there was no consistency or relationship between the 3 temperatures. Mortality of maize weevils varied from 77.9 to 100% in all chemical treatments, and no F1 adults were produced. Mortality of red flour beetles exposed on corn was also variable among treatments and residual bioassays, but survival was not dependent on either chemical treatment or bioassay month and no F1 adults were produced. This is the first published report of a study in which pyrazoles have been evaluated against stored-product insects.

Last Modified: 7/23/2014
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