Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Histological Evaluation of Potassium Permanganate Toxicity in Channel Catfish.

Authors
item Darwish, Ahmed
item Griffin, Billy
item Straus, David
item Mitchell, Andrew

Submitted to: Annual Meeting World Aquaculture Society
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: December 12, 2001
Publication Date: January 27, 2002
Citation: DARWISH, A.M., GRIFFIN, B.R., STRAUS, D.L., MITCHELL, A.J. HISTOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF POTASSIUM PERMANGANATE TOXICITY IN CHANNEL CATFISH.. ANNUAL MEETING WORLD AQUACULTURE SOCIETY. 2002. p.81.

Technical Abstract: A histological study was performed to evaluate the effect of waterborne exposure of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) to one, three and five times the therapeutic concentration of KMnO4 (0.438, 1.315 and 2.190 mg KMnO4/L), calculated based on the KMnO4 demand, for 36 h, which is three times the therapeutic duration. The organs examined were the gill, liver and trunk kidney. Differential leukocyte counts of neutrophils and monocytes in the blood and plasma enzyme analyses (lactate dehydrogenase and alanine transaminase) were also performed. Gill was the only organ to show lesions. The gills of fish exposed to the therapeutic concentration of KMnO4 for 36 h had mild hypertophy and spongiosis; lesions were not apparent 2 d post-exposure. Gills of fish exposed to three and five times the therapeutic dose had extensive hyperplasia, epithelial hypertophy and necrosis, lamellar fusion, leukocytic infiltration and obliteration of the interlamellar space with an inflammatory exudate containing necrotic epithelial cells. The gills exposed to three and five times the therapeutic dose for 36 h appeared normal at 8 d post-exposure. There was a significant increase in the neutrophil count and the plasma alanine transaminase activity in fish exposed to five times the therapeutic dose. The results demonstrated that exposure to the therapeutic dose at three times the therapeutic exposure time causes mild lesions and recovery occurs within 48 h post-exposure.

Last Modified: 8/29/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page