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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Kenaf Seed Oil

Authors
item Webber, Charles
item Mohamed, Ali - VIRGINIA STATE UNIVERSITY
item Bhardwaj, Harbans - VIRGINIA STATE UNIVERSITY
item Hamama, Anwar - VIRGINIA STATE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Kenaf Association International Conference Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: June 20, 2000
Publication Date: July 1, 2000
Citation: WEBBER III, C.L., MOHAMED, A., BHARDWAJ, H., HAMAMA, A. KENAF SEED OIL. KENAF ASSOCIATION INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS. 2000. P. 36.

Technical Abstract: Seed from kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L) may provide an excellent oil resource. The objectives of this research was to determine the quality and quantity of oil, fatty acids, phospholipids, and sterols in seed of nine kenaf genotypes (Cubano, Everglades 41, Everglades 71, GR2563, Guatemala 48, Indian, 178-18RS-10, Tainung #1, and Tainung #2). Oil content ranged from 21.4 to 26.4% with a mean of 23.7%. Total phospholipids ranged from 3.9 to 10.3% of the oil, with a mean of 6.0%. Total sterol percentage was similar to that reported for soybean and cottonseed oil. Mean sterol percent was 0.9 and ranged from 0.6% of the total oil for 178-18RS-10 accession to 1.2% for Everglades 71. Palmitic (20.1% of the total fatty acids), oleic (29.2%), and linoleic (45.9%) were the major fatty acids, and palmitoleic (1.6%), linolenic (0.7%), and stearic (3.5%) were the minor components. Medium (C12-C14) and long (C22-C24) chain fatty acids were less than 1%. Sphingomyelin (4.42% of the total phospholipids), phosphatidyl ethanolamine (12.8%), phosphatidyl choline (21.9%), phosphatidyl serine (2.9%), phosphatidyl inositol (2.7%), lysophosphatidyl choline (5.3%), phosphatidyl glycerol (8.9%), phosphatidic acid (4.9%), and cardiolipin (3.6%) were identified in the nine genotypes. Phosphatidyl choline, phosphatidyl ethanolamine, and phosphatidyl glycerol were the dominant phospholipids. Kenaf's relatively high oil content and its similarity to cottonseed oil suggest that the seed oil may be used as an excellent source of edible oil for human consumption. In addition to potential advantages of a longer shelf life, the sterol emulsions could be used in reducing hypercholesterolemia. The variation among genotypes also indicates potential for genetic improvement in oil yield and quality.

Last Modified: 10/23/2014
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