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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SUGARBEET GERMPLASM DEVELOPMENT AND INNOVATIVE GENETIC AND MANAGEMENT APPROACHES TO REDUCING LOSSES CAUSED BY PATHOGENS

Location: Northwest Irrigation and Soils Research

Title: Disease notes - Bacterial root rot

Authors
item Neher, Oliver -
item Strausbaugh, Carl

Submitted to: The Sugarbeet
Publication Type: Trade Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 12, 2013
Publication Date: April 1, 2013
Citation: Neher, O.T., Strausbaugh, C.A. 2013. Disease notes - Bacterial root rot. The Sugarbeet. Spring:30-31.

Technical Abstract: Bacterial root rot initiated by lactic acid bacteria, particularly Leuconostoc, occurs every year in Idaho sugarbeet fields. Hot fall weather seems to make the problem worse. Although Leuconostoc initiates the rot, other bacteria and yeast frequently invade the tissue as well. The acetic acid bacteria, particularly Gluconobacter, are what give the rotted tissue a fermented vinegar-like smell. The bacteria gain entry into the root through wounds caused by rodents, growth cracks, and fungal lesions such as those associated with Rhizoctonia root rot. No definite management practices for bacterial root rot in sugarbeet have been established, but minimizing problems with rodents and fungal root rots would be advisable.

Last Modified: 8/22/2014
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