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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED PEANUT GERMPLASM AND RESISTANCE TO DISEASE AND NEMATODE PESTS

Location: Crop Genetics and Breeding Research

Title: Research from the Coastal Plain Experiment Station, Tifton, Georgia, to minimize contamination in peanut

Authors
item Holbrook, C
item Ozias-Akins, P -
item Timper, Patricia
item Wilson, D -
item Cantonwine, E -
item Guo, Baozhu
item Sullivan, Dana
item Dong, W -

Submitted to: Toxin Reviews
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 30, 2009
Publication Date: September 25, 2009
Repository URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15569540802497673
Citation: Holbrook Jr, C.C., Ozias-Akins, P., Timper, P., Wilson, D.M., Cantonwine, E., Guo, B., Sullivan, D.G., Dong, W. 2008. Research from the Coastal Plain Experiment Station, Tifton, Georgia, to minimize contamination in peanut. Toxin Reviews. 27:391-410.

Interpretive Summary: Aspergillus fungi can colonize seed of several agricultural crops including peanut, and this can result in the contamination of the edible yield from these crops with the toxic chemical, aflatoxin. Scientists with the United States Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service and scientists with the University of Georgia located at the Coastal Plain Experiment Station in Tifton, Georgia have been conducting research on aflatoxin contamination of peanut since the early 1960's. Early efforts were focused on identifying the risk factors for increased aflatoxin contamination and helped to document the importance of drought, high soil temperatures, and pod damage. Later efforts were focused on the development of screening techniques and the identification of sources of resistance to Aspergillus colonization and/or aflatoxin contamination. This laid the foundation for a conventional breeding program and has resulted in the development of peanut breeding lines that have high yield and low aflatoxin contamination relative to standard control cultivars. Recent research efforts include studies on the use of molecular genetic approaches to reduce aflatoxin contamination. This includes the evaluation of genetically engineered peanut and the development of molecular markers.

Technical Abstract: Scientists with the United States Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service and scientists with the University of Georgia located at the Coastal Plain Experiment Station in Tifton, Georgia have been conducting research on aflatoxin contamination of peanut since the early 1960's. Early efforts were focused on identifying the risk factors for increased aflatoxin contamination and helped to document the importance of drought, high soil temperatures, and pod damage. Later efforts were focused on the development of screening techniques and the identification of sources of resistance to Aspergillus colonization and/or aflatoxin contamination. This laid the foundation for a conventional breeding program and has resulted in the development of peanut breeding lines that have high yield and low aflatoxin contamination relative to standard check cultivars. Recent research efforts include studies on the use of molecular genetic approaches to reduce aflatoxin contamination. This includes the evaluation of genetically engineered peanut and the development of molecular markers.

Last Modified: 8/22/2014