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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: RESEARCH TO DEVELOP STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGIES FOR PRESERVING PLANT GENETIC DIVERSITY IN EX SITU GENEBANKS Title: Advantages For The Use Of Standardized Phenotyping In The National Plant Germplasm System

Author
item Volk, Gayle

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: July 25, 2009
Publication Date: July 25, 2009
Citation: Volk, G.M. 2009. Advantages For The Use Of Standardized Phenotyping In The National Plant Germplasm System. Meeting Abstract. HortScience 44:976

Interpretive Summary: The USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System maintains a diverse collection of more than 500,000 accessions. This national resource has become very valuable as genomic technologies progress and it becomes possible to retrieve genetic information from one species and utilize it in another. Genomic sequence data is becoming prevalent in databases; however, associated phenotypic data is much more expensive and difficult to obtain. It often involves multi-year, multi-location evaluation trials and comprehensive databases for information storage are not available. Full database documentation of data collection methods and standards would enable data users to compare results and apply them to their research programs. Existing databases provide some information, but details regarding field site locations, conditions, and methods of replication are often lacking. Standardized ontologies for trait classification provide a mechanism by which searches can be efficiently performed. By improving database documentation systems, the value of existing data can be determined. Through standardization efforts, results can be compared across years, researchers, and locations. Both genotypic and phenotypic data can then be analyzed to identify germplasm accessions of interest for improved yield, quality, and stress tolerance.

Technical Abstract: The USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System maintains a diverse collection of more than 500,000 accessions. This national resource has become very valuable as genomic technologies progress and it becomes possible to retrieve genetic information from one species and utilize it in another. Genomic sequence data is becoming prevalent in databases; however, associated phenotypic data is much more expensive and difficult to obtain. It often involves multi-year, multi-location evaluation trials and comprehensive databases for information storage are not available. Full database documentation of data collection methods and standards would enable data users to compare results and apply them to their research programs. Existing databases provide some information, but details regarding field site locations, conditions, and methods of replication are often lacking. Standardized ontologies for trait classification provide a mechanism by which searches can be efficiently performed. By improving database documentation systems, the value of existing data can be determined. Through standardization efforts, results can be compared across years, researchers, and locations. Both genotypic and phenotypic data can then be analyzed to identify germplasm accessions of interest for improved yield, quality, and stress tolerance.

Last Modified: 12/19/2014
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