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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Ipm Technologies for Insect Pests of Orchard Crops

Location: Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research

Project Number: 6618-22320-001-00
Project Type: Appropriated

Start Date: Dec 27, 2010
End Date: Dec 26, 2015

Objective:
1. Chemical Ecology: Develop semiochemical-based control methods for citrus pests, particularly Asian citrus psyllid (ACP). 1a. Develop behavioral assays and antennogram methods for key citrus pests to identify conspecific odors that mediate mate location, recognition or aggregation and use these compounds for control and monitoring. 1b. Insect-Plant Interactions: Identification of host and nonhost compounds that affect host selection, location or repellency. 2. Biological Control: Develop new and improve existing biological control methods for ACP and sharpshooter species. 2a. Establish natural enemies of ACP in Florida. 2b. Identify new viral pathogens of ACP and sharpshooter species, and evaluate the potential of these as management strategies. 3. Host Plant Resistance: Develop host plant resistance in citrus to key pests. 3a. Identify sources of plant resistance to ACP in citrus germplasm. 3b. Develop novel control methods based on disrupting key processes in pest biology.

Approach:
Behavioral assays and antennogram (EAG/EAD) methods will be developed for key citrus pests to identify conspecific odors that mediate mate location, recognition or aggregation. Methods for monitoring and control using these compounds will be developed. Host and nonhost compounds will be identified that affect host selection, location or repellency through the use of gas chromatography (GC), GC-EAD, and GC-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). To increase natural biological control of the Asian citrus psyllid, haplotypes of the parasitoid Tamarixia radiata will be characterized and released as deemed appropriate. Viral pathogens of Asian citrus psyllid and sharpshooter species will be identified by genomic methods and evaluated as management strategies. Existing citrus germplasm will be screened for host plant resistance to Asian citrus psyllids under greenhouse and field conditions. Genes and proteins involved in key biological processes such as salivary sheath formation will be studied to develop novel control strategies that block these processes.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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