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Delta Healthy Sprouts
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Delta Healthy Sprouts Project

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The Delta Healthy Sprouts Project was an 18-month, randomized, controlled, comparative effectiveness trial. It was designed to compare the impact of two Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) curriculum on weight status, dietary intake, and other health behaviors of mothers and their infants residing in the rural Mississippi Delta region.

Publications:

Thomson JL, Tussing-Humphreys LM, Goodman MH. Delta Healthy Sprouts: A randomized comparative effectiveness trial to promote maternal weight control and reduce childhood obesity in the Mississippi Delta. Contemporary Clinical Trials 2014;38:82-91. DOI: 10.1016/j.cct.2014.03.004

Thomson JL, Tussing-Humphreys LM, Goodman MH, Olender S. Baseline demographic, anthropometric, psychosocial, and behavioral characteristics of rural, Southern women in early pregnancy. Maternal and Child Health Journal [serial online] 2016;20(5). DOI: 10.1007/s10995-016-2016-y

Thomson JL, Tussing-Humphreys LM, Goodman MH, Olender S. Gestational weight gain: results from the Delta Healthy Sprouts comparative impact trial. Journal of Pregnancy [serial online] 2016. DOI: 10.1155/2016/5703607

Tussing-Humphreys LM, Thomson JL, Goodman MH, Olender S. Maternal diet quality and nutrient intake in the gestational period: Results from the Delta Healthy Sprouts comparative impact trial. Maternal Health, Neonatology & Perinatology [serial online] 2016;2:8. DOI: 10.1186/s40748-016-0036-7

Thomson JL, Tussing-Humphreys LM, Goodman MH, Olender SE. Physical activity changes during pregnancy in a comparative impact trial. American Journal of Health Behavior 2016;40(6):685-696. DOI: 10.5993/AJHB.40.6.1

Goodman MH, Thomson JL, Tussing-Humphreys LM. Lessons learned from the implementation of the Delta Healthy Sprouts comparative effectiveness trial. SAGE Research Methods [serial online] 2017;12:15. DOI: 10.4135/9781526424006

Thomson JL, Tussing-Humphreys LM, Goodman MH, Landry AS, Olender SE. Low rate of initiation and short duration of breastfeeding in a maternal and infant home visiting project targeting rural, Southern, African American women. International Breastfeeding Journal [serial online] 2017;12:15. DOI: 10.1186/s13006-017-0108-y

Tussing-Humphreys LM, Thomson JL, Hemphill NON, Goodman MH, Landry AS. Maternal weight in the postpartum: Results from the Delta Healthy Sprouts Trial. Maternal Health, Neonatology & Perinatology [serial online] 2017;3:20. DOI: 10.1186/s40748-017-0058-9

Thomson JL, Tussing-Humphreys LM, Landry AS, Goodman MH. No improvements in postnatal dietary outcomes were observed in a two-arm, randomized, controlled, comparative impact trial among rural, Southern, African-American women. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics 2018;118(7):1196-1207. DOI: 10.1016/j.jand.2017.11.010

Thomson JL, Tussing-Humphreys LM, Goodman MH, Landry AS. Enhanced curriculum intervention did not result in increased postnatal physical activity in rural, Southern, primarily African American women. American Journal of Health Promotion 2018;32(2):464-472. DOI: 10.1177/0890117117736090

Thomson JL, Goodman MH, Tussing-Humphreys, Landry AS. Infant growth outcomes from birth to 12 months of age: Findings from the Delta Healthy Sprouts randomized comparative impact trial. Obesity Science & Practice [serial online] 2018;4(4):299-307. DOI: 10.1002/osp4.272 

Thomson JL, Tussing-Humphreys LM, Goodman MH, Landry AS. Infant activity and sleep behaviors in a maternal and infant home visiting project among rural, Southern, African American women. Maternal Health, Neonatology, and Perinatology [serial online] 2018;4:10. DOI: 10.1186/s40748-018-0078-0 

Tussing-Humphreys L, Thomson JL, Goodman M, Landry A. Enhanced vs standard Parents as Teacher curriculum on factors related to infant feeding among African American women. Southern Medical Journal 2019;112(10):512-519. DOI: 10.14423/SMJ.0000000000001024