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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: OPTIMIZING IRRIGATION MANAGEMENT FOR HUMID CLIMATES

Location: Cropping Systems and Water Quality Research

Title: Investigating the Potential for Rice Production with Sprinkler Irrigation

Authors
item Vories, Earl
item Stevens, W -
item Tacker, P -
item Counce, P -
item Henggeler, J -
item Wrather, A -

Submitted to: Proceedings for CIGR World Congress Meetings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: March 8, 2010
Publication Date: August 11, 2010
Citation: Vories, E.D., Stevens, W., Tacker, P., Counce, P., Henggeler, J., Wrather, A. 2010. Investigating the Potential for Rice Production with Sprinkler Irrigation. In: Proceedings for 17th CIGR World Congress Meetings, June 13-17, 2010, Quebec City, Canada. Paper ID: CSBE100561. Available: https://bioeng.ca/publications/meetings-papers?sobi2Task=sobi2Details&catid=18&sobi2Id=240

Interpretive Summary: Almost all rice produced in the US Mid-South is grown in a flooded culture that requires more irrigation water than other crops grown in the region. One approach investigated for reducing the water requirements involved sprinkler irrigation rather than continuous flood, but problems, including disease, precluded widespread adoption. However, recently there has been renewed interest in the system in both the US and internationally. New research in Missouri aims to develop a successful production system for sprinkler irrigated rice. Less water was applied using the system than indicated by published values for flooded rice in the region, and observed yields were comparable to state-average rice yields in Missouri. These studies are continuing and expanding in 2010 and an additional study is planned to address irrigation requirements with the goal of further reducing water requirements. Successful results of this research will benefit farmers by giving them additional production options and saving them money they would otherwise have to spend for energy to pump water. In addition, everyone will benefit from improved water and energy conservation practices.

Technical Abstract: Almost all rice (Oryza sativa L.) produced in the US Mid-South is grown in a flooded culture that requires considerably more irrigation water than other crops grown in the region. One approach investigated for reducing the water requirements for rice involved producing rice with sprinkler irrigation rather than with continuous flood. Problems, including disease, were observed that precluded widespread adoption of the system; however, recently there has been renewed interest in both the US and internationally. The objectives of this research were to develop and test a procedure for scheduling irrigations on sprinkler irrigated rice and investigate the suitability of chemigation for disease control. Studies were conducted at the University of Missouri Delta Research Center Marsh Farm at Portageville on a field with highly variable soils. An experimental crop coefficient function was developed and included in a beta version of the Arkansas Irrigation Scheduler. A total of 410 mm of irrigation water was applied, less than published values for flooded rice in the region, but additional observations with varying climatic conditions will be required to determine whether the crop coefficient function is adequate. Strips of blast resistant and susceptible cultivars were produced with no fungicide and with fungicide chemigation. Observed yields with chemigation (6.0 - 8.3 Mg/ha) were comparable to five-year state-average-rice yields in Missouri (7.5 Mg/ha). However, susceptible cultivars were severely impacted by blast when no fungicide was applied. These studies are continuing in 2010 and an additional study is planned to address irrigation requirements.

Last Modified: 4/20/2014
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