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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Deaeration and Pasteurization Effects on the Orange Juice Aromatic Fraction

Authors
item Jordan, Maria - UNIV OF MURCIA (SPAIN)
item Goodner, Kevin
item Laencina, J - UNIV OF MURCIA (SPAIN)

Submitted to: Lebensmittel Wissenschaft und Technologie
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 6, 2002
Publication Date: March 1, 2003
Citation: JORDAN, M.J., GOODNER, K.L., LAENCINA, J. DEAERATION AND PASTEURIZATION EFFECTS ON THE ORANGE JUICE AROMATIC FRACTION. LEBENSMITTEL WISSENSCHAFT UND TECHNOLOGIE. 2003. v. 36. p. 391-396.

Interpretive Summary: A comparative study was conducted to determine the affects of two industrial processing steps on the volatile flavor compounds in orange juice. The first process is a deaeration process used to remove the air from orange juice and the second is pasteurization. While no volatile flavor compounds were completely lost, about 43% of the quantitated compounds were statistically different after removing the air (and taking some of the volatile compounds with it). After pasteurization, 51% of the compounds exhibited a statistically significant change in concentration. This information is important to the citrus industry since it helps pinpoint the processing steps that most affect the quality of finished orange juice.

Technical Abstract: A comparative study between the aromatic profile in fresh orange juice versus deaerated and pasteurized juices respectively was conducted in order to understand the evolution of volatile components after deaeration and pasteurization processes. Analysis of the aromatic fraction was carried out using simultaneous steam distillation extraction (SDE) for isolation of the volatile fraction. At the qualitative level there were no total losses of volatile components after deaeration and pasteurization processes. According to statistical analyses, significant losses in concentration of volatile components occur during the deaeration process, while there were no statistically significant differences determined among concentrations of volatile components in deaerated and pasteurized process. These results show that during the industrial processing of orange juice the biggest losses in the concentration of volatile components occurs during deaeration. The pasteurization process does not change the analytical composition of deaerated orange juice in a significant way for any of the 42 quantitated compounds.

Last Modified: 4/21/2014