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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Pyraloidea Specimens Labelled As Rebel Types from Egypt at the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

Author
item Solis, M

Submitted to: Nota Lepidopterologia
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 17, 2003
Publication Date: July 17, 2003
Citation: Solis, M.A. 2003. Pyraloidea specimens labelled as rebel types from egypt at the national museum of natural history, smithsonian institution, washington, d.c.. Nota Lepidopterologia. 26:59-63

Interpretive Summary: In the classification of species the scientific name and description are based on a type specimen. Knowing where these types are located and their condition can be important to invetigator's working on pest species. Five snout moth type specimens collected in Egypt, and now at the National Museum of Natural History, Washington, D.C., are illustrated. Two specimens were found feeding on plants, one on lavender and another on Acacia. Lavender is used as a scent by the perfume and/or cosmetics industry, and Acacia, although a source of timber and by-products, is also an invasive tree in some parts of the world. The true identity of the moths will allow classifiers, biological control workers, and action agency identifiers to correctly identify and use these moth species.

Technical Abstract: The Anastase Alfieri collection from Egypt, acquired by the National Museum of Natural History (USNM), Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., in 1965, included 5 pyraloid type specimens described by Rebel (1926): Piletocera opacali, Pseudosyria gracili, Heterographis acrobasella, Acrobasis pumilella, and Trachypteryx acanthotecta. The type specimens are figured and the nomenclatural status in the literature of each species is described. This note informs the Lepidoptera community that they are deposited at the National Museum of Natural History for utilization in future systematic research.

Last Modified: 4/19/2014
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