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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Quantification and Identification of Anthocyanins in Foods Using Hplc Ms/ms with Dad Detection

Authors
item Wu, Xianli - ACNC
item Gu, Liwei - ACNC
item Holden, Joanne
item Haytowitz, David
item Gebhardt, Susan
item Beecher, Gary
item Prior, Ronald

Submitted to: International Food Data Base Conference Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: April 15, 2003
Publication Date: June 30, 2003
Citation: WU, X., GU, L., HOLDEN, J.M., HAYTOWITZ, D.B., GEBHARDT, S.E., BEECHER, G.R., PRIOR, R.L. QUANTIFICATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF ANTHOCYANINS IN FOODS USING HPLC MS/MS WITH DAD DETECTION. INTERNATIONAL FOOD DATA BASE CONFERENCE. 2003. Abstract p. B26.

Interpretive Summary: Anthocyanins are widely distributed in many different foods. They belong to the flavonoid family of polyphenolics and are responsible for the red, blue or purple colors of many fruits and vegetables. More and more studies have shown that anthocyanins may have some health benefits. Most research has focused on the antioxidant properties. In order to evaluate the effects of anthocyanins on human health, researchers need to know how much and what kinds of anthocyanins are consumed daily. Sixty-six different food samples were collected from four different areas of the US in two different seasons as part of USDA's National Food and Nutrient Analysis Program. These 66 different foods were screened to determine if they contained anthocyanins and the complete anthocyanin profile and content were obtained on those foods containing anthocyanins. A total of 66 different foods were screened and 16 of those contained anthocyanins including 12 fruits, 3 vegetables and 1 nut, and were analyzed (120 samples total) for their anthocyanin profile and content. Among them, the number of anthocyanins in each different sample varied from one (red leaf lettuce) to 25 (blueberry). Only the 6 common aglycones (anthocyanidins) (cyanidin, delphinidin, pelargonidin, petunidin, peonidin and malvidin) were identified in these samples. The content of anthocyanins in different samples varied from 0.079 ± 0.007.89 mg/g for Pistachios to 32.64 ± 2.03 mg/g for blackberries on a dry weight basis. The results provide the complete HPLC and mass spectral data of anthocyanins for 16 common fresh foods in the U.S. market. This will allow researchers to calculate the daily intake of anthocyanins and further evaluate their health effects.

Technical Abstract: Anthocyanins are widely distributed in many different foods. They belong to the flavonoid family of polyphenolics and are responsible for the red, blue or purple colors of many fruits and vegetables. More and more studies have shown that anthocyanins may have some health benefits. Most research has focused on the antioxidant properties. In order to evaluate the effects of anthocyanins on human health, researchers need to know how much and what kinds of anthocyanins are consumed daily. Objective: Sixty-six different food samples were collected from four different areas of the US in two different seasons as part of USDA's National Food and Nutrient Analysis Program. These 66 different foods were screened to determine if they contained anthocyanins and the complete anthocyanin profile and content were obtained on those foods containing anthocyanins. Methods and Materials: Food samples were extracted using weakly acidic methanol solvent, and then analyzed by reversed phase HPLC-MS/MS with a diode array (DAD) detector. Anthocyanins were identified by means of MS spectra and comparing the retention time with standards. The amount of anthocyanins in the foods was based upon 6 anthocyanidin-3-glucoside standards. Results: A total of 66 different foods were screened and 16 of those contained anthocyanins including 12 fruits, 3 vegetables and 1 nut, and were analyzed (120 samples total) for their anthocyanin profile and content. Among them, the number of anthocyanins in each different sample varied from one (red leaf lettuce) to 25 (blueberry). Only the 6 common aglycones (anthocyanidins) (cyanidin, delphinidin, pelargonidin, petunidin, peonidin and malvidin) were identified in these samples. The content of anthocyanins in different samples varied from 0.079 ± 0.007.89 mg/g (Pistachios) to 32.64 ± 2.03 mg/g (Blackberries) dry weight. Significance: The results provide the complete HPLC and MS spectra data of anthocyanins for 16 common fresh foods in the U.S. market, which also included samples from 4 different geographic areas and 2 different seasons. This will allow researchers to calculate the daily intake of anthocyanins and further evaluate their health effects.

Last Modified: 4/19/2014
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