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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Sugar Beet Microsatellites

Authors
item Panella, Leonard
item Brownson, Mary
item Richards, Christopher
item Mitchell, Sharon - CORNELL UNIVERSITY
item Kresovich, Stephen - CORNELL UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Plant Animal and Microbe Genomes Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: December 19, 2001
Publication Date: January 13, 2002
Citation: Panella, L.W., Brownson, M.P., Richards, C.M., Mitchell, S.E., Kresovich, S. 2002. Sugar beet microsatellites . Plant Animal and Microbe Genomes Conference.

Interpretive Summary: Microsatellite have become important molecular markers for studying the genetic diversity of many eukaryotic organisms. Currently, there are few publically available microsatellite markers (four report by Moerchen and coworkers in 1996) from the economically important crop species, Beta vulgaris, L. The objective of this study was to develop a microsatellite-enriched library from which to identify primer sequences to use to develop a set microsatellite for use in sugar beet . Clones were isolated and sequenced from libraries that were enriched for (CA/GT)n repeats developed from the released sugar beet germplasm 'FC709-2'. Twenty-five of these showed unique flanking sequences and were used for primer development. Of these 25, thirteen have been chosen for analysis. Three populations with twenty plants from each population have been examined. Populations were from the Sugar Beet and Garden Beet group of Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris and one population of wild sea beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima). As expected, heterozygousity and the number of alleles were highest in the wild sea beet population, while the inbred Garden Beet population was often monomorphic at the microsatellite loci. The most polymorphic locus examined had eight alleles present in the three populations at frequencies ranging from 34.9% to 1.4%. Two microsatellite loci contained only two alleles in the populations examined. Microsatellite loci should become useful tools in looking at genetic shifts and gene flow in sugar beet and wild sea beet sea populations.

Technical Abstract: Microsatellite have become important molecular markers for studying the genetic diversity of many eukaryotic organisms. Currently, there are few publically available microsatellite markers (four report by Moerchen and coworkers in 1996) from the economically important crop species, Beta vulgaris, L. The objective of this study was to develop a microsatellite-enriched library from which to identify primer sequences to use to develop a set microsatellite for use in sugar beet . Clones were isolated and sequenced from libraries that were enriched for (CA/GT)n repeats developed from the released sugar beet germplasm 'FC709-2'. Twenty-five of these showed unique flanking sequences and were used for primer development. Of these 25, thirteen have been chosen for analysis. Three populations with twenty plants from each population have been examined. Populations were from the Sugar Beet and Garden Beet group of Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris and one population of wild sea beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima). As expected, heterozygousity and the number of alleles were highest in the wild sea beet population, while the inbred Garden Beet population was often monomorphic at the microsatellite loci. The most polymorphic locus examined had eight alleles present in the three populations at frequencies ranging from 34.9% to 1.4%. Two microsatellite loci contained only two alleles in the populations examined. Microsatellite loci should become useful tools in looking at genetic shifts and gene flow in sugar beet and wild sea beet sea populations.

Last Modified: 4/16/2014
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