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Research Project: Applied Agricultural Genomics and Bioinformatics Research

Location: Genomics and Bioinformatics Research

Title: Identification of simple sequence repeat (SSR) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that are associated with nectariless trait of Gossypium hirsutum L.

Author
item PARK, SANG-HYUCK - University Of Colorado
item Scheffler, Jodi
item Ray, Jeffery - Jeff
item Scheffler, Brian

Submitted to: Euphytica
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/20/2021
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Cotton has nectaries containing concentrated nectar. The nectar attracts some beneficial insects such as bees that feed on the nectar, but also insects that damage the plant. There is a naturally occurring mutation that eliminates the nectaries and makes the cotton plants less attractive to insects. Transferring this “no nectary” (nectariless) trait to cotton cultivars can be done faster and more efficiently with DNA markers to help the plant breeder accurately select for the nectariless trait in early generations of the breeding process. This study identified markers, associated with the trait, that can be used by breeders to develop cotton with decreased attractiveness to damaging insects and reduce the need to insecticides.

Technical Abstract: Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) has nectar containing modified stomates called nectaries that are located on the leaves, bracts or base of the flowers. The nectar attracts some beneficial insects such as bees, but also predatory damaging insects such as heliothines and Lygus species. There is a naturally occurring mutation that eliminates the nectar containing nectaries and makes the cotton plants less attractive to insects. The nectariless (ne) trait is associated a double recessive mutation of two genes (ne1ne2) on the homeologous chromosomes 12 and 26. Expression of the trait differs in leaves and bracts and is also affected by environmental conditions. This makes accurately selecting for the trait based on phenotype difficult. If DNA markers associated with the two genes conditioning the trait could be identified and used for marker assisted selection (MAS), cotton cultivars could be easily developed that would decrease their attractiveness to insects and reduce the need for insecticides, especially those harmful to beneficial insects such as honeybees. This study identified SSR and SNP markers that can be used by breeders for MAS.