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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: FORMATION OF EXTERNAL WAXY PARTICLES BY ADULT BEMISIA ARGENTIFOLII AND SEMIDALIS FLINTI)

Author
item Nelson, Dennis
item Freeman, Thomas
item Buckner, James
item Hoelmer, Kim
item Hagler, James
item Jackson, Charles

Submitted to: National Research and Action Plan for Silver Leaf Whitefly
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/18/1998
Publication Date: N/A
Citation:

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Semidalis flinti, dustywing predator in southwestern USA, active on shrubs/trees in areas around agriculture & urban areas where whiteflies reside between crops. Larvae/adults consume Bemisia eggs/nymphs; larvae 2000 eggs during development & adults 8.5 eggs + 8.8 nymphs per hr. Whiteflies & dustywings cover themselves with waxy particles. Whiteflies with a mixture of long-chain aldehydes & alcohols, from abdominal wax plates. The major components are 34 carbons in length in Bemisia & in greenhouse whiteflies 32 carbons. Dustywings cover themselves with waxy particles from individual wax pores. The end of each waxy ribbon curls back on itself to form a cylinder (particle) about one micrometer in diameter which breaks off. Cuticular lipids (plus waxy particles) were fatty acids (47%), alcohols (7%), hydrocarbons (20%), putative wax esters (4%), diacylglycerols (10%). Same lipids found in male/female dustywings. Major hydrocarbon 3,7,11-trimethylheptacosane, 70 ng/female & 50 ng/male. Free fatty acids 1000 ng/female & 1220 ng/male; major is tetracosanoic acid, 70% of free fatty acids. Alcohols a minor lipid class (6%) on dustywings. Whiteflies & dustywings cover themselves & surroundings with waxy particles but had completely different surface chemistry. Adult whiteflies had particles of long-chain aldehydes & alcohols as well as wax esters on the cuticle surface. Dustywings did not have long-chain aldehydes & little alcohol. Major component from dustywing was free fatty acids. They also had small amounts of methyl-branched hydrocarbons whereas whiteflies had very little hydrocarbon, either branched or straight chain.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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