Skip to main content
ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Boise, Idaho » Northwest Watershed Research Center » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #96782

Title: APPLICATION OF HYDRAULIC MODELING APPROACHES TO A RANGELAND WATERSHED STREAM

Author
item Slaughter, Charles
item GOODWIN, PETER

Submitted to: Society for Range Management Meeting Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/8/1998
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Upland, headwaters rangelands typically support small streams and narrow riparian zones. Engineering hydraulic modeling has traditionally focused on larger rivers and downstream reaches. There is growing need for re-evaluation of river management practices. An ability to reliably model streamflow, sediment transport and deposition, and channel and floodplain geometry changes in rangeland streams would enhance the range managers' <> for analysis and management of streams and riparian zones. Control structures imposed on a watercourse invariably alter flow regime, affect transport of suspended sediment and bedload, and consequently alter hydraulic geometry and geomorphic characteristics of channel, riparian zone and floodplain downstream and upstream of the structure. These changes commonly alter the frequency of extreme events, and result in less diverse riparian biological communities. We describe application of a widely-used river hydraulic model for streamflow and sediment transport in an upland rangeland stream, in contrast to application on a large sixth-order river. Results support the necessity to include upland, headwater streams and their contributing watersheds in assessing river systems, and to recognize dynamic channel hydraulic processes in developing integrated management strategies for rangelands, headwaters and downstream river systems for a broad spectrum of competing objectives.