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ARS Home » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #96580

Title: PREVALENCE OF CAMPYLOBACTER JEJUNI AND CAMPYLOBACTER COLI IN PIGS IN THE UNITED STATES

Author
item SIDDIQUE, I
item WALEID, M
item Wesley, Irene

Submitted to: Veterinary Immunology International Symposium
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/25/1998
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli have been known to be causative agents of human enterocolitis since the 1970s and are considered to be the most important human pathogens in this genus. Being the most common cause of diarrhoea in many industrialized countries, C. jejuni/C. coli infection is responsible for a major public health problem. Several publications implicate food of animal origin as source of human campylobacteriosis. Both Campylobacters may exist as commensals in the intestinal tract of pigs and has been known as a potential source of human infection. In order to study the prevalence of C. jejuni/coli in the swine population, fecal samples were collected from apparently healthy pigs that were in 75 farms located in 16 states. A multiplex PCR assay using two primer sets was used for the identification and simultaneous differentiation of C. jejuni and C. coli, 95.7% of the isolates were C. coli positive and 4.3% were C. jejuni positive. The recovery of C. jejuni ranged from 0 to 10% and C. coli from 0 to 46%. Farm 21 of Iowa had the highest percent positive for C. jejuni - 10% (3/30) and farm 45 of Indiana having the highest percent positive for C. coli 46% (23/50). C. jejuni/coli were not detected in 34 farms out of the 75 farms. The swine top producing state (Iowa) gave a low incidence rate of 5.6% (43/762). The isolation percent was 8.7% in July, 4.2% in August, and 1.7% in September.