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Research Project: Novel Weed Management Tools from Natural Product-Based Discoveries

Location: Natural Products Utilization Research

Title: Menthalactone from Mentha piperita L., a Monocot-Selective Bioherbicide

Author
item SOLTANI, ADAM - University Of Mississippi
item OSPANOV, MEIRAMBEK - University Of Mississippi
item IBRAHIM, ZEYAD - University Of Mississippi
item Bajsa-Hirschel, Joanna
item Cantrell, Charles
item CIZDZIEL, JAMES - University Of Mississippi
item KHAN, IKHLAS - University Of Mississippi
item IBRAHIM, MOHAMED - University Of Mississippi

Submitted to: International Journal of Plant Biology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/5/2024
Publication Date: 4/11/2024
Citation: Soltani, A., Ospanov, M., Ibrahim, Z.M., Bajsa Hirschel, J.N., Cantrell, C.L., Cizdziel, J.V., Khan, I.A., Ibrahim, M.A. 2024. Menthalactone from Mentha piperita L., a Monocot-Selective Bioherbicide. International Journal of Plant Biology. 15, 293-303. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijpb15020025.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijpb15020025

Interpretive Summary: The challenge of managing invasive weed species continues to affect the agricultural industry, presenting ecological, economic, and agronomic hurdles that globally lead to over $100 billion in annual crop losses. One such concern is the management of Agrostis stolonifera, commonly known as creeping bentgrass, particularly due to its ability to form hybrids. This scenario underscores the urgent need for innovative, effective, and environmentally sustainable herbicides, steering the focus toward natural substances as potential candidates. We report here a promising natural lactone, commonly known as menthalactone, which is derived from Mentha piperita L. The phytotoxic activity was assessed against the monocot, bentgrass (A. stolonifera), and a dicot, lettuce (Lactuca sativa). Menthalactone displayed outstanding activity against bentgrass, and was further evaluated for phytotoxic characteristics. The germination of A. stolonifera seeds was significantly inhibited with an IC50 value of 4.9 ± 1.2 µM. In contrast to bentgrass seeds, Lemna pausicostata plants were less responsive to menthalactone treatment shown by an IC50 of 293.4 ± 70.6 µM. Both species are monocots, and the results suggest that menthalactone might have effects on seed germination but not on the metabolism in green tissues. The susceptibility to menthalactone of three common, obnoxious weed species i.e., ryegrass (Lilium perenne), barnyard grass (Echinochloa crusgalli), and crabgrass (Digitaria sanguinalis) was assessed. Menthalactone at 1000 µM completely inhibited the germination of all three species of grasses, while 330 µM inhibited germination by less than 50%. Post-emergence application of menthalactone at 1% did not produce a significant inhibitory effect against ryegrass, barnyard grass, or crabgrass.

Technical Abstract: The challenge of managing invasive weed species continues to affect the agricultural industry, presenting ecological, economic, and agronomic hurdles that glob-ally lead to over $100 billion in annual crop losses. One such concern is the management of Agrostis stolonifera, commonly known as creeping bentgrass, particularly due to its ability to form hybrids. This scenario underscores the urgent need for innovative, effective, and environmentally sustainable herbicides, steering the focus toward natural substances as potential candidates. We report here a promising natural lactone, commonly known as menthalactone, which is derived from Mentha piperita L. The phytotoxic activity was assessed against the monocot, bentgrass (A. stolonifera), and a dicot, lettuce (Lactuca sativa). Menthalactone displayed outstanding activity against bentgrass, and was further evaluated for phytotoxic characteristics. The germination of A. stolonifera seeds was significantly inhibited with an IC50 value of 4.9 ± 1.2 µM. In contrast to bentgrass seeds, Lemna pausicostata plants were less responsive to menthalactone treatment shown by an IC50 of 293.4 ± 70.6 µM. Both species are monocots, and the results suggest that menthalactone might have effects on seed germination but not on the metabolism in green tissues. The susceptibility to menthalactone of three common, obnoxious weed species i.e., ryegrass (Lilium perenne), barnyard grass (Echinochloa crusgalli), and crabgrass (Digitaria sanguinalis) was assessed. Menthalactone at 1000 µM com-pletely inhibited the germination of all three species of grasses, while 330 µM inhibited germination by less than 50%. Post-emergence application of menthalactone at 1% did not produce a significant inhibitory effect against ryegrass, barnyard grass, or crabgrass.