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Research Project: Domestic Production of Natural Rubber and Resins

Location: Bioproducts Research

Title: Field to greenhouse: methods for evaluating the impact of short-term soil storage on the stability of the soil microbiome

Author
item KUSHWARA, PRIYANKA - University Of Arizona
item SOTO VELÁZQUEZ, ANA - University Of Arizona
item McMahan, Colleen
item NEILSON, JULIA - University Of Arizona

Submitted to: Microorganisms
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/3/2024
Publication Date: 1/5/2024
Citation: Kushwara, P., Soto Velázquez, A.L., McMahan, C.M., Neilson, J. 2024. Field to greenhouse: methods for evaluating the impact of short-term soil storage on the stability of the soil microbiome. Microorganisms. 12,110. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms12010110.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms12010110

Interpretive Summary: The soil microbiome, i.e. the naturally-occurring mixture of bacteria, fungi, and archaea found in cultivated fields, is known to significantly impact plant productivity. Controlled greenhouse studies using field soils provide a mechanism to investigate the plant-microbial interactions that impact productivity; however, a major challenge for greenhouse experiments is the verification of soil microbiome preservation from the time of removal from the field until initiation of greenhouse experiments. This study determined the changes in the soil microbiome over 9 weeks of storage by DNA sequencing methods. Based on our findings, we recommend future studies be set-up within 3-weeks of field soil collection, or a preliminary study should be conducted to evaluate how long the integrity of the field soil microbiome can be preserved.

Technical Abstract: Controlled greenhouse studies using field soils provide a mechanism to investigate plant-microbial interactions that impact plant productivity. The major methodological challenge is preservation of the field soil microbiome. This 9-week storage experiment under field moisture and temperature conditions demonstrated that the soil microbiome remains stable for up to 3 weeks.