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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Mycology and Nematology Genetic Diversity and Biology Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #402725

Research Project: Fungal Systematics and Diagnostic Resource Development for Safeguarding Plant Health

Location: Mycology and Nematology Genetic Diversity and Biology Laboratory

Title: Molecular phylogeny and morphology reveal two new graminicolus species, Curvularia aurantia sp. nov. and C. vidyodae sp. nov. with new records of Curvularia spp. from Sri Lanka

Author
item FERNANDEZ, HIMASHI - UNIVERSITY OF SRI JAYEWARDENEPURA
item MANAMGODA, DIMUTHU - UNIVERSITY OF SRI JAYEWARDENEPURA
item UDAYANGA, DHANUSKA - UNIVERSITY OF SRI JAYEWARDENEPURA
item MUNASINGHE, MAYRURI - UNIVERSITY OF SRI JAYEWARDENEPURA
item Castlebury, Lisa

Submitted to: Fungal Systematics and Evolution
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/28/2023
Publication Date: 9/28/2023
Citation: Fernandez, H.S., Manamgoda, D.S., Udayanga, D., Munasinghe, M.S., Castlebury, L.A. 2023. Molecular phylogeny and morphology reveal two new graminicolus species, Curvularia aurantia sp. nov. and C. vidyodae sp. nov. with new records of Curvularia spp. from Sri Lanka. Fungal Systematics and Evolution. 12(1):219-246. https://doi.org//10.3114/fuse.2023.12.11.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3114/fuse.2023.12.11

Interpretive Summary: Many fungi cause plant diseases but have not yet been given formal names or descriptions. Accurate names allow communication about the biology and pathology of fungal species. During the course of a study of fungi on grasses in Sri Lanka, two species previously unknown to science were discovered and five species newly discovered in Sri Lanka. Additionally five species of Curvularia were found in association with new grass hosts. in Sri Lanka. This information is important because many staple food crops are in the grass family and plant pathologists, plant breeders, diagnosticians and regulatory officials need to be aware of potential pathogens and their movements.

Technical Abstract: Despite being a small island, Sri Lanka is rich in fungal diversity. Most of the fungi from Sri Lanka have been identified as pathogens of vegetables, fruits, and plantation crops to date. The pleosporalean genus Curvularia (Dothideomycetes) includes phytopathogenic, saprobic, endophytic, and human/animal opportunistic pathogenic fungal species. The majority of the plant-associated Curvularia species are known from poaceous hosts. During the current study, 22 geographical locations of the country were explored and collections were made from 10 different poaceous hosts. Morphology and molecular phylogeny based on three loci, including nuclear internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 with 5.8S nrDNA (ITS), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gapdh), and translation elongation factor 1-a (tef1) supported the description of two new species of fungi described herein as C. aurantia sp. nov. and C. vidyodayana sp. nov. Moreover, novel host-fungal association records for C. chiangmaiensis, C. falsilunata, C. lonarensis, C. plantarum, and C. pseudobrachyspora are updated herein. In addition, five species within the genus Curvularia, viz., C. asiatica, C. geniculata, C. lunata, C. muehlenbeckiae, and C. verruculosa represent new records of fungi from Sri Lanka