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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Mayaguez, Puerto Rico » Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #390427

Research Project: Genetic Improvement of Stress Tolerance in Common Bean through Genetic Diversity and Accelerated Phenotyping

Location: Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research

Title: Genome-wide association study (GWAS) of traits associated with drought and heat tolerance, and common bacterial blight resistance, of in multiple interspecific tepary-common bean populations

Author
item ROSAS-SOTOMAYOR, JUAN - Zamorano, Panamerican School Of Agriculture
item RODRIGUEZ, IVETH - Zamorano, Panamerican School Of Agriculture
item BEAVER, JAMES - University Of Puerto Rico
item Porch, Timothy - Tim

Submitted to: CEIBA: A Scientific and Technical Journal
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/2/2023
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Common bean production in Central America is threaten by increases in temperature caused by climate change. Most traditional bean cultivars are more affected by heat due to their limited adaptation to high temperatures. Improved cultivars released during the past two decades are better adapted to warmer temperature conditions in tropical lowlands, but over time could lose adaptation due to continued increases in temperature. The objective of the study was to identify bean accessions tolerant to higher temperatures combined with superior agronomic traits and desirable commercial seed types for their release as cultivars or for their use as parents in breeding programs. More than 300 common bean advanced lines and germplasm were evaluated in trials conducted in different planting seasons during 2015-16 in Nacaome, a location in Southern Honduras where high day and night temperatures are present year around. Significant differences in seed yield were observed between lines although differences varied due to line × planting season interaction. Heat tolerant bean lines were identified including the Andean landrace ‘Indeterminant Jamaica Red’, the Mesoamerican lines USMR20, SJC 730-79, MER 2212-28, ‘Beníquez’, SB-DT1, PR 9920-171 and FBN 1211-66, and the interspecific line INB 841. The greatest adaptation to high temperatures was observed in tepary bean accessions used as tolerant checks. Common bean heat tolerant accessions with good agronomic adaptation and seed yield were identified in this study, including some that have been released as cultivars and other used as parents in breeding programs. The release of these heat tolerant cultivars could increase productivity of common bean in Central America and improve the livelihoods of small farmers and consumers who depend on this crop.

Technical Abstract: Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production in Central America is threaten by increases in temperature caused by climate change. Most traditional bean cultivars are more affected by heat due to their limited adaptation to high temperatures. Improved cultivars released during the past two decades are better adapted to warmer temperature conditions in tropical lowlands, but over time could lose adaptation due to continued increases in temperature. Objective. The objective of the study was to identify bean accessions tolerant to higher temperatures combined with superior agronomic traits and desirable commercial seed types for their release as cultivars or for their use as parents in breeding programs. Materials and Methods. More than 300 common bean advanced lines and germplasm were evaluated in trials conducted in different planting seasons during 2015-16 in Nacaome, a location in Southern Honduras where high day and night temperatures are present year around. Significant differences in seed yield were observed between lines although differences varied due to line × planting season interaction. Results. Heat tolerant bean lines were identified including the Andean landrace ‘Indeterminant Jamaica Red’, the Mesoamerican lines USMR20, SJC 730-79, MER 2212-28, ‘Beníquez’, SB-DT1, PR 9920-171 and FBN 1211-66, and the interspecific line INB 841. The greatest adaptation to high temperatures was observed in tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius A. Gray) accessions used as tolerant checks. Discussion and Conclusion. Common bean heat tolerant accessions with good agronomic adaptation and seed yield were identified in this study, including some that have been released as cultivars and other used as parents in breeding programs.