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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Ames, Iowa » National Animal Disease Center » Infectious Bacterial Diseases Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #389969

Research Project: Intervention Strategies for Spirochete Diseases

Location: Infectious Bacterial Diseases Research

Title: Complete Genome Sequence of Four Strains of Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo isolated from Cattle in the Central United States

Author
item Putz, Ellie
item Bayles, Darrell
item Alt, David
item Nally, Jarlath

Submitted to: Journal of Genomics
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/24/2022
Publication Date: 2/14/2022
Citation: Putz, E.J., Bayles, D.O., Alt, D.P., Nally, J.E. 2022. Complete Genome Sequence of Four Strains of Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo isolated from Cattle in the Central United States. Journal of Genomics. Volume 10, pgs 45-48 journal of genomics. https://doi.org/10.7150/jgen.69822.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.7150/jgen.69822

Interpretive Summary: The leading cause of bovine leptospirosis is Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo. Compared to L. interrogans, the leading cause of human leptospirosis, the genome of L. borgpetersenii is much smaller and relatively few genomes have been sequenced. In this study, we sequenced the genome of 4 recent isolates of L. borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo and compared them to the genome of another bovine isolate obtained over 30 years ago. This work facilitates continued comparative genome analysis with other serovar Hardjo isolates, separated over time and geography, to identify conserved genome features, understand evolutionary traits that predispose serovar Hardjo to persistent carriage in cattle and zoonotic transmission, and gain additional insights into pathogenic mechanisms of infection.

Technical Abstract: Pathogenic species of Leptospira cause leptospirosis, a global zoonotic disease affecting humans and all major livestock species. Cattle act as a reservoir host for L. borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo which colonize the kidneys and reproductive tract from which they are excreted and transmitted to other cattle via urine, semen or uterine discharges. Bovine leptospirosis results in reproductive failure, abortion, stillbirth and loss of milk production, and is an occupational risk for those working with infected animals. A recent study determined that 7.2% of cattle from an abattoir in the central United States were actively shedding pathogenic Leptospira. Here, we report and compare the complete genome sequence of four recent isolates of L. borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo designated strain TC112, TC147, TC129, and TC273.