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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BHNRC) » Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center » Methods and Application of Food Composition Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #389408

Research Project: USDA National Nutrient Databank for Food Composition

Location: Methods and Application of Food Composition Laboratory

Title: Databases of Iodine Content of Foods and Dietary Supplements––Availability of New and Updated Resources

Author
item ERSHOW, ABBY - National Institutes Of Health (NIH)
item HAGGANS, CAROL - National Institutes Of Health (NIH)
item ROSELAND, JANET - Consultant
item PATTERSON, KRIS - Retired ARS Employee
item SPUNGEN, JUDITH - Food And Drug Administration(FDA)
item GAHCHE, JAIME - National Institutes Of Health (NIH)
item MERKEL, JOYCE - National Institutes Of Health (NIH)
item Pehrsson, Pamela

Submitted to: Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
Publication Type: Review Article
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/2/2022
Publication Date: 4/1/2022
Citation: Ershow, A., Haggans, C., Roseland, J., Patterson, K., Spungen, J., Gahche, J., Merkel, J., Pehrsson, P.R. 2022. Databases of Iodine Content of Foods and Dietary Supplements––Availability of New and Updated Resources. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2022.03.017.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2022.03.017

Interpretive Summary: The iodine status of the U.S. population is adequate overall, but some people might have insufficient iodine intakes and would benefit from certain dietary changes. Identifying these individuals can be challenging, however, due to a lack of data on the iodine content of foods and dietary supplements. To fill this gap, a new online database––the USDA, FDA, and ODS-NIH Database for the Iodine Content of Common Foods––was released in 2020. It contains about 430 foods and beverages, such as dairy products and eggs, baby foods, vegetables, meats, mixed dishes, juices, seafood, various types of salt, restaurant foods, and baked goods, including breads made with and without iodate-containing dough conditioners. Data are presented as mean iodine content for both standard serving sizes and per 100 g of food, along with standard deviations, value ranges, and sample sizes. The new database, combined with the existing Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database, which contains chemically analyzed values for the iodine content of dietary supplements, and the newly updated Dietary Supplement Label Database, which contains label information from thousands of dietary supplements on the market, provides comprehensive data to help assess the iodine intakes of individuals and populations

Technical Abstract: The iodine status of the U.S. population is adequate overall, but some people might have insufficient iodine intakes and would benefit from certain dietary changes. Identifying these individuals can be challenging, however, due to a lack of data on the iodine content of foods and dietary supplements. To fill this gap, a new online database––the USDA, FDA, and ODS-NIH Database for the Iodine Content of Common Foods––was released in 2020. It contains about 430 foods and beverages, such as dairy products and eggs, baby foods, vegetables, meats, mixed dishes, juices, seafood, various types of salt, restaurant foods, and baked goods, including breads made with and without iodate-containing dough conditioners. Data are presented as mean iodine content for both standard serving sizes and per 100 g of food, along with standard deviations, value ranges, and sample sizes. The new database, combined with the existing Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database, which contains chemically analyzed values for the iodine content of dietary supplements, and the newly updated Dietary Supplement Label Database, which contains label information from thousands of dietary supplements on the market, provides comprehensive data to help assess the iodine intakes of individuals and populations.