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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Pullman, Washington » Animal Disease Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #388689

Research Project: Development of Detection and Control Strategies for Bovine Babesiosis and Equine Piroplasmosis

Location: Animal Disease Research

Title: Harnessing Mycobacterium bovis BCG trained immunity to control human and bovine babesiosis

Author
item BASTOS, REGINALDO - Washington State University
item ALZAN, HEBA - Washington State University
item RATHINASAMY, VIGNESH - James Cook University
item COOKE, BRIAN - James Cook University
item DELLAGOSTIN, ODIR - Universidade Federal De Pelotas
item BARLETTA, RAUL - University Of Nebraska
item Suarez, Carlos

Submitted to: Vaccines
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/10/2022
Publication Date: 1/14/2022
Citation: Bastos, R.G., Alzan, H.F., Rathinasamy, V.A., Cooke, B.M., Dellagostin, O.A., Barletta, R.G., Suarez, C.E. 2022. Harnessing Mycobacterium bovis BCG trained immunity to control human and bovine babesiosis. Vaccines. 10(1):123. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10010123.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10010123

Interpretive Summary: Babesiosis is a tickborne disease caused by Babesia parasites that affects a variety of vertebrate hosts. Human babesiosis, caused primarily by B. microti in the US and B. divergens in Europe, is considered an emerging public health condition. B. bovis and B. bigemina are the most prevalent agents of bovine babesiosis, a disease that negatively impacts food safety worldwide. Studies demonstrate that early activation of innate immune responses is essential for the vertebrate host to survive the acute phase of the disease. Development of efficient and sustainable strategies to control human and bovine babesiosis are urgently needed. Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), a widely used anti-tuberculosis attenuated vaccine, has re-emerged as a potent inducer of trained immunity, which can activate innate immune cells to respond more efficiently to unrelated pathogens. Overall, this review focuses on the prospective use of trained immunity provoked by BCG to prime innate immune cells and develop control strategies against human and bovine babesiosis.

Technical Abstract: Babesiosis is a tickborne disease caused by Babesia parasites that affects a variety of vertebrate hosts. Human babesiosis, caused primarily by B. microti in the US and B. divergens in Europe, is considered an emerging public health condition. B. bovis and B. bigemina are the most prevalent agents of bovine babesiosis, a disease that negatively impacts food safety worldwide. Studies demonstrate that early activation of innate immune responses is essential for the vertebrate host to survive the acute phase of the disease. Development of efficient and sustainable strategies to control human and bovine babesiosis are urgently needed. Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), a widely used anti-tuberculosis attenuated vaccine, has re-emerged as a potent inducer of trained immunity, which can activate innate immune cells to respond more efficiently to unrelated pathogens. Overall, this review focuses on the prospective use of trained immunity provoked by BCG to prime innate immune cells and develop control strategies against human and bovine babesiosis.