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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Corvallis, Oregon » National Clonal Germplasm Repository » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #386880

Research Project: Management of Temperate-Adapted Fruit, Nut, and Specialty Crop Genetic Resources and Associated Information

Location: National Clonal Germplasm Repository

Title: Genotype, environment, year, and harvest effects on fruit quality traits of five blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) cultivars

Author
item REDPATH, LAUREN - NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY
item GUMPERTZ, MARCIA - NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY
item BALLINGTON, JAMES - NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY
item Bassil, Nahla
item ASHRAFI, HAMID - NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Agronomy
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/4/2021
Publication Date: 9/7/2021
Citation: Redpath, L., Gumpertz, M., Ballington, J., Bassil, N.V., Ashrafi, H. 2021. Genotype, environment, year, and harvest effects on fruit quality traits of five blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) cultivars. Agronomy. 11(9). Article 1788. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11091788.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11091788

Interpretive Summary: Cultivated blueberries are adapted to a range of climates and growing conditions. Genetic differences influence phenotype of blueberry accessions. In addition, variability in geographic and climatic growing conditions between or among environments may further affect fruit and plant phenotypic expression. As a result, a phenotype is a function of genetic background, environment, and their interaction. In addition, other temporally regulated factors such as year and harvest time impact plant and fruit quality phenotypic variation. The objective of this study was to assess the genotypic performance of five blueberry cultivars, including ‘Echota’, ‘O’Neal’, ‘Reveille’, ‘Summit’, and ‘Sunrise’. The selected cultivars were phenotyped for various fruit quality-related traits over two sequential harvests in two years and two locations, Corvallis, Oregon and Jackson Springs, North Carolina. Our results indicated that genotype is a major source of variation for most phenotypic traits. Further, the interaction between year and harvest time as well as that between genotype by year by harvest time significantly affected the majority of studied phenotypic traits. Within the studied genotypes, the evaluated phenotypes of ‘Reveille’ and ‘O’Neal’ were consistent across locations and years, while those of ‘Summit’ were stable across years, locations, and harvests. Clonal plant replicates within genotype, harvest, and environment, as well as individual fruit measures were the most significant source of variability.

Technical Abstract: Blueberries (Vaccinium spp.) comprise a broad range of perennial woody species, in which native Vaccinium species are found across North America, ranging from Canada through Mexico. Introgression of native species into cultivated germplasm has adapted Vaccinium germplasm to a range of climates and growing conditions for cultivated blueberry. Genetic differences signify phenotypic variance that is observed among blueberry accessions. In addition, variability in geographic and climatic growing conditions between or among environments may further affect fruit and plant phenotypic expression. As a result, a phenotype is a function of genetic background (G), environment (E), and their interaction (G × E). In addition, other temporally regulated factors such as year (Y) and harvest time (H) impact plant and fruit quality phenotypic variation. Our research aimed to assess the genotypic performance of five blueberry cultivars, including ‘Echota’, ‘O’Neal’, ‘Reveille’, ‘Summit’, and ‘Sunrise’. The selected cultivars were phenotyped for various fruit quality-related traits over two sequential harvests in two years and two locations. Our results indicated that genotype is a major source of variation for most phenotypic traits. Further, the effect of Y × H as well as G × Y × H, significantly affected the majority of studied phenotypic traits. Within the studied genotypes, ‘Reveille’ and ‘O’Neal’ phenotypic stability were consistent across locations and years, with ‘Summit’ characteristics stable across years, locations, and harvests. Clonal plant replicates within genotype, harvest, and environment, as well as individual fruit measures were the most significant source of variability.