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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Little Rock, Arkansas » Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #386338

Research Project: Impact of Maternal Influence and Early Dietary Factors on Child Growth, Development, and Metabolic Health

Location: Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center

Title: Supervised resistance training on functional capacity, muscle strength and vascular function in peripheral artery disease: An updated systematic review and meta-analysis

Author
item BLEARS, ELIZABETH - University Of Texas Medical Branch
item ELIAS, JESSICA - University Of Texas Medical Branch
item TAPKING, CHRISTIAN - University Of Texas Medical Branch
item PORTER, CRAIG - Arkansas Children'S Nutrition Research Center (ACNC)
item RONTOYANNI, VICTORIA - University Of Texas Medical Branch

Submitted to: Journal of Clinical Medicine
Publication Type: Review Article
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/12/2021
Publication Date: 5/19/2021
Citation: Blears, E.E., Elias, J.K., Tapking, C., Porter, C., Rontoyanni, V.G. 2021. Supervised resistance training on functional capacity, muscle strength and vascular function in peripheral artery disease: An updated systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 10(10):2193. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10102193.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10102193

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Supervised resistance training appears to be a promising alternative exercise modality to supervised walking in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). This meta-analysis examined the efficacy of supervised RT for improving walking capacity, and whether adaptations occur at the vascular and/or skeletal muscle level in PAD patients. We searched Medline, CINAHL, Scopus, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in PAD patients testing the effects of supervised RT for >=4 wk. on walking capacity, vascular function, and muscle strength. Pooled effect estimates were calculated and evaluated using conventional meta-analytic procedures. Six RCTs compared supervised RT to standard care. Overall, supervised RT prolonged claudication onset distance during a 6-min walk test (6-MWT) (101.7 m (59.6, 143.8), p < 0.001) and improved total walking distance during graded treadmill walking (SMD: 0.67 (0.33, 1.01), p < 0.001) and the 6-MWT (49.4 m (3.1, 95.6), p = 0.04). Five RCTS compared supervised RT and supervised intermittent walking, where the differences in functional capacity between the two exercise modalities appear to depend on the intensity of the exercise program. The insufficient evidence on the effects of RT on vascular function and muscle strength permitted only limited exploration. We conclude that RT is effective in prolonging walking performance in PAD patients. Whether RT exerts its influence on functional capacity by promoting blood flow and/or enhancing skeletal muscle strength remains unclear.