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ARS Home » Southeast Area » New Orleans, Louisiana » Southern Regional Research Center » Commodity Utilization Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #384867

Research Project: Improved Conversion of Sugar Crops into Food, Biofuels, Biochemicals, and Bioproducts

Location: Commodity Utilization Research

Title: Acid hydrolysis of sucrose in sweet sorghum syrup followed by succinic acid production using a genetically engineered Escherichia coli

Author
item Klasson, K Thomas
item STURM, MATTHEW - LOUISIANA TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY
item COLE, MARSHA - LOUISIANA TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Biocatalysis and Agricultural Biotechnology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/17/2021
Publication Date: 11/25/2021
Citation: Klasson, K.T., Sturm, M.P., Cole, M.R. 2022. Acid hydrolysis of sucrose in sweet sorghum syrup followed by succinic acid production using a genetically engineered Escherichia coli. Biocatalysis and Agricultural Biotechnology. 39:102231. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bcab.2021.102231.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bcab.2021.102231

Interpretive Summary: Acid breakdown of sucrose was studied as a method to convert sucrose in sweet sorghum syrup into glucose and fructose before fermentation using a succinic acid-producing strain of Escherichia coli. Successful breakdown of sucrose in sweet sorghum syrup was done using moderate temperatures, 65-85°C, with mild acid in less than 30 min. The measured sucrose breakdown rates were lower than previously reported for sweet sorghum molasses. The E. coli strain consumed all the sugars (glucose and fructose) in the treated sweet sorghum syrup. The main products were succinic and acetic acid. The final concentration of succinic acid was 27 g/L, but the bacterium was shown to produce more succinic acid (60 g/L), when grown under optimal conditions on pure glucose.

Technical Abstract: Acid hydrolysis of sucrose acid hydrolysis was studied as a method to convert sucrose in sweet sorghum syrup into glucose and fructose before fermentation using the genetically engineered succinic acid-producing Escherichia coli strain AFP184. Successful hydrolysis of sucrose in sweet sorghum syrup was achieved without noticeable formation of degradation products using moderate temperatures, 65-85°C, with 0.24-0.48 M HCl in less than 30 min. The measured sucrose hydrolysis rates were lower than previously reported for sweet sorghum molasses. The E. coli strain AFP184 consumed all the sugars (glucose and fructose) in the sweet sorghum syrup hydrolysate. The products were predominately succinic and acetic acid. The final concentration of succinic acid was 27 g/L, but the organism was shown to produce higher levels of succinic acid (60 g/L), when grown under optimal conditions on pure glucose.