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ARS Home » Plains Area » Clay Center, Nebraska » U.S. Meat Animal Research Center » Nutrition, Growth and Physiology » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #384371

Research Project: Improve Nutrient Management and Efficiency of Beef Cattle and Swine

Location: Nutrition, Growth and Physiology

Title: Vitamin and mineral supplementation and rate of gain during the first trimester of gestation affect the abundance of fat-soluble vitamins in fetal liver at d 83 of gestation

Author
item Crouse, Matthew
item MCCARTHY, KACIE - University Of Nebraska
item MENEZES, ANA CLARA - North Dakota State University
item KASSETAS, CIERRAH - North Dakota State University
item BAUMGAERTNER, FRIEDERIKE - North Dakota State University
item KIRSCH, JAMES - North Dakota State University
item DORSAM, SHERI - North Dakota State University
item NEVILLE, TAMMI - North Dakota State University
item WARD, ALISON - North Dakota State University
item BOROWICZ, PAWEL - North Dakota State University
item REYNOLDS, LAWRENCE - North Dakota Department Of Agriculture
item SEDIVEC, KEVIN - North Dakota State University
item FORCHERIO, J - Land O' Lakes Purina Feed, Llc
item SCOTT, RONALD - Land O' Lakes Purina Feed, Llc
item CATON, JOEL - North Dakota State University
item DAHLEN, CARL - North Dakota State University

Submitted to: Journal of Animal Science Supplement
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/3/2021
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: We hypothesized that feeding a vitamin and mineral (VTM) supplement to heifers at two rates of gain during early gestation would alter the abundance of fat-soluble vitamins in fetal liver at d 83 of gestation. Seventy-two crossbred Angus heifers (initial BW = 359.5 ± 7.1 kg) were randomly assigned to one of four treatments in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement with main effects of VTM supplement and rate of gain [low gain (LG), 0.28 kg/d, vs. moderate gain (MG), 0.79 kg/d]. The VTM treatment (113 g•heifer-1•d-1, provided vitamins A, D, and E, and macro and trace minerals to meet 110% of requirements) was initiated at a minimum of 71 d before AI. To complete the factorial, heifers were either maintained on the LG diet, or received the MG diet implemented by adding a protein/energy supplement to the LG diet at breeding. Thirty-five heifers confirmed pregnant with female fetuses were ovariohysterectomized on d 83 of gestation, and fetal liver was collected and frozen. Samples were shipped to Metabolon Inc., and a relative concentration profile of all structurally named small-molecule entities were detected by the HD4 Global Metabolomics platform. Statistical analysis was completed by Welch’s Two Sample t-Test. Tocopherol and Vitamin A metabolism were the pathways with the greatest differences in relative metabolite concentrations. Mean relative abundance of Gamma/Beta-tocopherol was NoVTM-LG = 0.658, NoVTM-MG = 1.803, VTM-LG = 0.193, and VTM-MG = 0.972. The relative abundance of gamma/beta-tocopherol was 9.34-fold greater in fetal liver of NoVTM-MG vs. VTM-LG (P < 0.0001), and 5.04-fold greater in VTM-MG vs. VTM-LG (P < 0.0001) heifers. The mean relative abundance of retinol was NoVTM-LG = 0.877, NoVTM-MG = 0.667, VTM-LG = 1.213, and VTM-MG = 1.143. The mean relative abundance of retinal was NoVTM-LG = 0.759, NoVTM-MG = 0.650, VTM-LG = 1.187, and VTM-MG = 1.155. The relative abundance of retinol and retinal were 1.38 and 1.56-fold greater in VTM-LG vs. NoVTM-LG, respectively (P