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ARS Home » Southeast Area » New Orleans, Louisiana » Southern Regional Research Center » Cotton Chemistry and Utilization Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #380362

Research Project: Enhanced Cotton for Value-Added Applications

Location: Cotton Chemistry and Utilization Research

Title: Cellulose nanofibers with gradient lignin degrees: a physicochemical comparison

Author
item Jordan, Jacobs
item Easson, Michael
item Thompson, Stephanie
item WU, QINGLIN - LSU Agcenter
item Condon, Brian

Submitted to: American Chemical Society National Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/10/2021
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: The use of agricultural waste and residues in composite materials is a potential high-value commercial application for underutilized renewable resources and provides alternative commercial markets to the cotton agricultural industry. Cotton gin trash (CGT) and cotton gin motes (CGM) are underutilized low-value commodities that are attractive targets due to their high cellulose content, however, agricultural residues typically require substantial purification prior to use. In this work, cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) were prepared with different degrees of processing that affected the final cellulose and lignin content, which affects their physical properties that are important for end-use applications both in the solid state and in solution.

Technical Abstract: The use of agricultural waste and residues in composite materials is a potential high-value commercial application for underutilized renewable resources and provides alternative commercial markets to the agricultural industry. Cotton gin trash (CGT) and cotton gin motes (CGM) are underutilized low-value commodities that are attractive targets due to their high cellulose content, however, each contains various amounts of lignin, hemicellulose and other components that impede their utilization as commercial products. In this work, lignin-containing cellulose nanofibers (LCNFs) with gradient degrees of lignin content were prepared from CGT and CGM. Analyses showed the lignin content and other components affected the physical properties of CNFs, altering their thermal stability and crystallinity. The degree of polymerization (DP) was smaller after successive rounds of processing and was dependent upon the source (CGT or CGM) with CGT providing nanofibers with a smaller DP than CGM whereas films of CGM were more hydrophyllic. This translated into slightly different suspension viscoelastic behavior as determined by rheological measurements.