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ARS Home » Plains Area » Fort Collins, Colorado » Center for Agricultural Resources Research » Rangeland Resources & Systems Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #379967

Research Project: Adaptive Grazing Management and Decision Support to Enhance Ecosystem Services in the Western Great Plains

Location: Rangeland Resources & Systems Research

Title: Social learning lessons from collaborative adaptive rangeland management

Author
item WILMER, HAILEY - Us Forest Service (FS)
item SCHULZ, TERRI - The Nature Conservancy
item FERNANDEZ-GIMENEZ, MARIA - Colorado State University
item Derner, Justin
item Porensky, Lauren
item Augustine, David
item RITTEN, JOHN - University Of Wyoming
item DWYER, ANGELA - Bird Conservancy Of The Rockies
item MURPH, RACHEL - Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS, USDA)

Submitted to: Rangelands
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/21/2021
Publication Date: 4/21/2021
Citation: Wilmer, H., Schulz, T., Fernandez-Gimenez, M., Derner, J.D., Porensky, L.M., Augustine, D.J., Ritten, J., Dwyer, A., Murph, R. 2021. Social learning lessons from collaborative adaptive rangeland management. Rangelands. 1-11. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rala.2021.02.002.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rala.2021.02.002

Interpretive Summary: • As “co-produced” research methods become more popular. • The Collaborative Adaptive Rangeland Management project is a case of a ranch-scale, 10-year grazing experiment ongoing in Colorado where we used social science to evaluate how the group learned and co-produced new knowledge. • This process of collaboration in research proved to be complex and challenging, but those challenges helped inspire learning as the team grappled with new problems and knowledge. Trust and respect were key to making the process work. • Social science can help collaborative research teams better design and implement complex co-production methods to engage stakeholders from ranching, conservation and public service backgrounds in research and learning activities.

Technical Abstract: • As “co-produced” research methods become more popular, there is a growing need to evaluate the processes and outcomes of successful cases. • The Collaborative Adaptive Rangeland Management project is a case of a ranch-scale, 10-year grazing experiment ongoing in Colorado where we used social science to evaluate how the group learned and co-produced new knowledge. • This process of collaboration in research proved to be complex and challenging, but those challenges helped inspire learning as the team grappled with new problems and knowledge. • Respect, trust, and shared understanding are essential to success and can be enhanced by commitment and time for meaningful discussion, debate, and group reflection. • Social science can help collaborative research teams better design and implement complex co-production methods to engage stakeholders from ranching, conservation and public service backgrounds in research and learning activities.