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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Tifton, Georgia » Southeast Watershed Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #378683

Research Project: Ecology and Biologically-based Management Systems for Insect Pests in Agricultural Landscapes in the Southeastern Region

Location: Southeast Watershed Research

Title: Effect of duration of deployment on parasitism and predation of Halyomorpha halys (Stal)(Hemiptera:Pentatomidae) sentinel egg masses in various host plants

Author
item Tillman, Patricia - Glynn
item Cottrell, Ted
item BALUSU, RAMMOHAN - Auburn University
item FADAMIRO, HENRY - Texas A&M University
item BUNTIN, DAVID - University Of Georgia
item SIAL, ASHFAQ - University Of Georgia
item VINSON, EDGAR - Auburn University
item TOWES, MICHAEL - University Of Georgia
item PATEL, DILANI - University Of Georgia
item Grabarczyk, Erin

Submitted to: Florida Entomologist
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/10/2020
Publication Date: 4/14/2022
Citation: Tillman, P.G., Cottrell, T.E., Balusu, R., Fadamiro, H., Buntin, D., Sial, A., Vinson, E., Towes, M., Patel, D., Grabarczyk, E.E. 2022. Effect of duration of deployment on parasitism and predation of Halyomorpha halys (Stal)(Hemiptera:Pentatomidae) sentinel egg masses in various host plants. Florida Entomologist. 150(1):44-52. https://doi.org/10.1653/024.105.0107.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1653/024.105.0107

Interpretive Summary: The pest risk potential for the newly invasive brown marmorated stink bug ( BMSB) is high in terms of crops affected and potential losses. Natural enemies may provide effective means of controlling BMSB, and commonly, laboratory-reared egg masses are hung on plants in the field to measure their effectiveness. However, the amount of time eggs are hung in the field may affect rates of predation and parasitism. In addition, BMSB lays eggs on plants in a variety of habitats. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate an optimal amount of time to hang BMSB egg masses in plants. In plum, peach, tomato, and sassafras, egg masses hung for five days resulted in higher parasitism compared to two days of exposure. In tomato, three days of hanging led to a higher parasitism than the 2d treatment. In sassafras, four days of exposure was the optimal amount of time for parasitism. In plum, when predation increased over the season, higher predation was detected five days after hanging compared to two or three days. For soybean and corn, parasitism in general was low regardless of how long they were hung in the field due to the high levels of predation. Longer periods of hanging eggs in the field provide more time for females to parasitize egg masses, resulting in higher levels of parasitism.

Technical Abstract: The invasive brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB), Halyomorpha halys (Stål), is considered an agricultural and nuisance pest in Georgia and Alabama. Natural enemies may provide effective means of controlling BMSB in this region, and commonly, sentinel egg masses are deployed on plants in the field to measure their effects. However, deployment duration may affect rates of predation and parasitism. In addition, BMSB oviposits on plants in a variety of habitats. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate an optimal exposure time of BMSB sentinel egg masses to parasitoids and predators in woodland, orchard, row crop, and vegetable habitats in these two states. Deployment duration affected percent parasitism and predation of BMSB sentinel egg masses in these habitats. In plum, peach, tomato, and sassafras, when significant differences were detected for parasitism, egg masses deployed for five days resulted in higher percent parasitism compared to two days of exposure. In tomato, three days of exposure led to a higher percentage of parasitism than the 2d treatment. In sassafras, four days of exposure was the optimal amount of time to assess the percentage of parasitism. In plum, when percent predation increased over the season, higher percent predation was detected five days after deployment compared to two or three days. For soybean and corn, percent parasitism in general was low regardless of deployment duration due in part to the high levels of predation. Longer deployment periods in the field may provide more time for females to search for and find suitable host plants and BMSB sentinel egg masses and to parasitize individual egg masses.