Skip to main content
ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Invasive Insect Biocontrol & Behavior Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #378383

Research Project: Urban Landscape Integrated Pest Management

Location: Invasive Insect Biocontrol & Behavior Laboratory

Title: Parasitism and predation on sentinel egg masses of three stink bug species (Heteroptera: pentatomidae) in native and exotic ornamental landscapes

Author
item Cornelius, Mary
item Herlihy-Adams, Megan
item Vinyard, Bryan
item Weber, Donald
item GREENSTONE, MATTHEW - COLLABORATOR

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/21/2020
Publication Date: 2/1/2021
Citation: Cornelius, M.L., Herlihy, M.V., Vinyard, B.T., Weber, D.C., Greenstone, M.H. 2021. Parasitism and predation on sentinel egg masses of three stink bug species (Heteroptera: pentatomidae) in native and exotic ornamental landscapes. Journal of Economic Entomology. https://doi.org/10.1093/jee/toaa329.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/jee/toaa329

Interpretive Summary: Stink bugs are insect pests that attack plants in ornamental landscapes. Although stink bug infestations of ornamental landscapes can be managed with natural predators and parasites of stink bugs, it is unclear if the composition of plants in such landscapes has an impact on the predation and parasitism of stink bugs. This study evaluated parasitism and predation on egg masses of three stink bug species, the spined soldier bug, the brown stink bug (Say), and the invasive brown marmorated stink bug in ornamental landscapes composed of either native or exotic trees and shrubs. This study also compared the species composition of parasitoids attacking two native stink bug species, the brown stink bug and the spined soldier bug, with those attacking the invasive brown marmorated stink bug on the same tree species in the same habitat. Overall, egg parasitism and predation were much higher on the two native stink bug species compared with the invasive brown marmorated stink bug. Egg predation was also significantly higher on the spined soldier bug than on native brown stink bug eggs. Eight parasitoid species attacked sentinel stink bug eggs in the ornamental landscaped plots. Trissolcus euschisti was the predominant parasitoid for all three stink bug species. There were no significant differences in parasitism and predation rates on any of the stink bug species between native and exotic plots. Therefore, there is no evidence that ornamental landscapes composed of native plants increased parasitism or predation rates of sentinel egg masses of two native stink bug species or the invasive brown marmorated stink bug, compared with those composed entirely of exotic plants. This study confirms that the invasive brown marmorated stink bug experiences much lower mortality rates in ornamental landscapes from natural enemies than native stink bugs which contributes to its status as a pest of ornamental trees.

Technical Abstract: This study evaluated parasitism and predation on sentinel egg masses of three stink bug species, the spined soldier bug, Podisus maculiventris (Say), the brown stink bug, Euschistus servus (Say), and the invasive brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB), Halyomorpha halys (Stål) (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae), in ornamental landscapes composed of either native or exotic trees and shrubs. This study also compared the species composition of parasitoids attacking two native stink bug species (P. maculiventris and E. servus) with those attacking the invasive BMSB on the same tree species in the same habitat. Overall, egg parasitism and predation were much higher on the two native stink bug species compared with the invasive BMSB, with an average parasitism rate of 20.6% for E. servus, 12.7% for P. maculiventris, and only 4.2% for H. halys and an average predation rate of 8.2% for E. servus,17.7% for P. maculiventris, and 2.3% for H. halys. Egg predation was also significantly higher on P. maculiventris than on E. servus eggs. Eight parasitoid species attacked sentinel stink bug eggs in the ornamental landscaped plots. Trissolcus euschisti (Ashmead) (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae) was the predominant parasitoid for all three stink bug species. There were no significant differences in parasitism and predation rates on any of the stink bug species between native and exotic plots. Therefore, there is no evidence that ornamental landscapes composed of native plants increased parasitism or predation rates of sentinel egg masses of two native stink bug species or the invasive BMSB, compared with those composed entirely of exotic plants.