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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Fort Pierce, Florida » U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory » Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #376761

Research Project: IPM Methods for Insect Pests of Orchard Crops

Location: Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research

Title: Asian citrus psyllid: biology, ecology and management of the huanglongbing vector

Author
item AMMAR, ELDESOUKY - Oak Ridge Institute For Science And Education (ORISE)
item Heck, Michelle
item Shatters, Robert - Bob

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/11/2020
Publication Date: 5/6/2020
Citation: Ammar, E., Heck, M.L., Shatters, R.G. 2020. Asian citrus psyllid: biology, ecology and management of the huanglongbing vector. Book Chapter. 127-155. https://doi.org/10.1079/9781786394088.0113.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1079/9781786394088.0113

Interpretive Summary: This chapter provides information on the main components of the transmission process of Liberibacter asiaticus and other Huanglongbing (HLB)-associated bacteria, i.e. acquisition from infected plants, translocation from the gut into other organs and tissues of the vector, evidence for multiplication in the vector and retention in the vector and inoculation of the pathogen into another host plant. The current knowledge of the HLB-associated bacterial pathosystem are also compared to that associated with Liberibacter solanacearum and its psyllid vectors affecting potatoes, tomatoes and other host plants in Solanaceae and Apiaceae, since the modes of transmission seem to be largely similar in both of these pathosystems.

Technical Abstract: This chapter provides information on the main components of the transmission process of Liberibacter asiaticus and other Huanglongbing (HLB)-associated bacteria, i.e. acquisition from infected plants, translocation from the gut into other organs and tissues of the vector, evidence for multiplication in the vector and retention in the vector and inoculation of the pathogen into another host plant. The current knowledge of the HLB-associated bacterial pathosystem are also compared to that associated with Liberibacter solanacearum and its psyllid vectors affecting potatoes, tomatoes and other host plants in Solanaceae and Apiaceae, since the modes of transmission seem to be largely similar in both of these pathosystem.