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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Tifton, Georgia » Crop Genetics and Breeding Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #376563

Research Project: Genetics and Integrated Management of Plant Parasitic Nematodes in Cotton and Peanut

Location: Crop Genetics and Breeding Research

Title: Managing Meloidogyne arenaria in peanut with old and new tools in the south-eastern USA

Author
item GRABAU, ZANE - University Of Florida
item TIMPER, PATRICIA - Patty

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/1/2020
Publication Date: 11/25/2021
Citation: Grabau, Z., Timper, P. 2021. Managing Meloidogyne arenaria in peanut with old and new tools in the south-eastern USA. In Sikora, R.A., editor. Integrated nematode management: state-of-the-art and visions for the future. Boston, MA: CABI International. p. 145-151. https://doi.org/10.1079/9781789247541.0021.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1079/9781789247541.0021

Interpretive Summary: The peanut root-knot nematode (PRKN) is the most important nematode pathogen of peanut in the southeastern United States. Economic losses in peanut from this nematode were estimated at 4% of total crop value for Georgia in 2017. This translates into $33 million in crop losses and an estimated additional $8 million for the cost of managing this nematode. Predictive sampling is useful for determining whether PRKN is above the damage threshold and, thus, requires a management intervention. For several decades, crop rotation has been widely used in much of the Southeast for managing nematodes and other soil-borne disease in peanut. Cotton and maize are common and effective rotations crops for reducing populations of PRKN. Nematicides are intended to temporarily reduce nematode populations and infection, protecting the crop from damage, and increasing yield. Nematicides often do not help with year to year nematode management because nematode populations often rebound by harvest after nematicides dissipate. In the last 10 years, peanut with a high level of resistance to PRKN have been commercially available. These cultivars often have high or moderate resistance to multiple diseases including TSWV increasing their usefulness to growers. A wider adoption of resistant cultivars by growers is needed. As newer resistant cultivars with higher yield potential are developed, many more growers should be able to reduce the use of costly nematicides by planting nematode-resistant cultivars. Moreover, research and extension are needed to demonstrate the economic and agronomic cost-benefit of planting a resistant cultivar at various PRKN levels.

Technical Abstract: The peanut root-knot nematode Meloidogyne arenaria is the most important nematode pathogen of peanut in the southeastern United States. Economic losses in peanut from M. arenaria damage were estimated at 4% of total crop value for Georgia in 2017. This translates into $33 million in crop losses and an estimated additional $8 million for the cost of managing this nematode. Predictive sampling is useful for determining whether M. arenaria is above the damage threshold and, thus, requires a management intervention. For several decades, crop rotation has been widely used in much of the Southeast for managing nematodes and other soil-borne disease in peanut. Cotton and maize are common and effective rotations crops for reducing populations of M. arenaria. Nematicides are intended to temporarily reduce nematode populations and infection, protecting the crop from some damage, and increasing yield. Nematicides often do not help with year to year nematode management because nematode populations often rebound by harvest after nematicides dissipate. In the last 10 years, peanut with a high level of resistance to M. arenaria have been commercially available. These cultivars often have high or moderate resistance to multiple diseases including TSWV increasing their usefulness to growers. A wider adoption of resistant cultivars by growers is needed. As newer resistant cultivars with higher yield potential are developed, many more growers should be able to reduce the use of costly nematicides by planting nematode-resistant cultivars. Moreover, research and extension are needed to demonstrate the economic and agronomic cost-benefit of planting a resistant cultivar at various M. arenaria population levels.