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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Fort Pierce, Florida » U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory » Subtropical Plant Pathology Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #375821

Research Project: Mitigating High Consequence Domestic, Exotic, and Emerging Diseases of Fruits, Vegetables, and Ornamentals

Location: Subtropical Plant Pathology Research

Title: Virus-virus interactions in a plant host and in a hemipteran vector: Implications for vector fitness and virus epidemics

Author
item GAUTAM, SAURABH - University Of Georgia
item GADHAVE, KIRAN - University Of Georgia
item BUCK, JAMES - University Of Georgia
item DUTTA, BHABESH - University Of Georgia
item COOLONG, TIM - University Of Georgia
item Adkins, Scott
item SRINIVASAN, RAJAGOPALBABU - University Of Georgia

Submitted to: Virus Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/16/2020
Publication Date: 6/20/2020
Citation: Gautam, S., Gadhave, K.R., Buck, J.W., Dutta, B., Coolong, T., Adkins, S.T., Srinivasan, R. 2020. Virus-virus interactions in a plant host and in a hemipteran vector: Implications for vector fitness and virus epidemics. Virus Research. 286 (2020) 198069. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.virusres.2020.198069.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.virusres.2020.198069

Interpretive Summary: Infection of crop plants with two or more viruses simultaneously may change symptoms in the plant and alter insect vector behavior as compared to infection with a single virus. Whitefly-virus pathosystems in the southern United States including cucurbit leaf crumple virus (CuLCrV), cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus (CYSDV) and tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) were examined in these studies. Mixed and single infections in squash or tomato were compared with respect to effects on symptoms and insect vector behavior. Our results indicate that mixed infection of viruses in host plants and acquisition of multiple viruses by the vector could have implications for virus accumulation, virus acquisition, vector preference, and epidemics that sometimes are different from single-virus infection or acquisition.

Technical Abstract: Mixed virus infection in crop plants can differentially alter the plant phenotype, influence vector fitness, and affect virus acquisition and inoculation by vectors than single-virus infection. Vector acquisition of multiple viruses from multiple plants could also differentially affect vector fitness and virus inoculation than acquisition of one virus. Whitefly-virus pathosystems in the southern United States include both of these facets. This study examined the effects of single and mixed infection of cucurbit leaf crumple virus (CuLCrV, a begomovirus) and cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus (CYSDV, a crinivirus) infecting squash on whitefly (Bemisia tabaci Gennadius MEAM1) host preference and fitness. This study also evaluated the effects of individual or combined acquisition of tomato-infecting tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV, a begomovirus) and squash-infecting CuLCrV on whitefly host preference and fitness. Our collective results indicate that mixed infection of viruses in crop plants and acquisition of multiple viruses by the vector could have implications for virus accumulation, virus acquisition, vector preference, and epidemics that sometimes are different from single-virus infection or acquisition.