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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Stoneville, Mississippi » Crop Genetics Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #375714

Research Project: Evaluation and Development of Improved Soybean Germplasm, Curation of USDA Accessions and Regional Evaluations of New Genotypes

Location: Crop Genetics Research

Title: Mitochondrial genome resource of Phomopsis longicolla, a fungus causing Phomopsis seed decay in soybean

Author
item Li, Shuxian
item DENG, YOUJIN - Fujian Agricultural & Forestry University

Submitted to: Phytofrontiers
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/2/2020
Publication Date: 4/21/2021
Citation: Li, S., Deng, Y. 2021. Mitochondrial genome resource of Phomopsis longicolla, a fungus causing Phomopsis seed decay in soybean. Phytofrontiers. 1(2):120-122. https://doi.org/10.1094/PHYTOFR-10-20-0027-A.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1094/PHYTOFR-10-20-0027-A

Interpretive Summary: Phomopsis seed decay is one of the most devastating seed diseases in soybean. It is caused by a fungus. The disease reduces soybean seed quality and suppresses yield, but information on how the fungus causes the disease is lacking. In this study, we described part of the genetic make-up of the fungus by determining the sequence of the fungus’ mitochondrial DNA. That information was added to a database that is accessible to other scientists. This research provides useful information for identification of the pathogen, which will aid in detection of the pathogen and in disease monitoring. Based on this knowledge, improved strategies for efficient control of Phomopsis seed decay in soybean could be developed.

Technical Abstract: Phomopsis seed decay is one of the most devastating seed diseases reducing soybean seed quality worldwide. This disease is caused primarily by a seed-borne fungus, Phomopsis longicolla (syn. Diaporthe longicolla). As part of a genome sequencing project for P. longicolla, we present the mitochondrial genome resource of the isolate MSPL10-6, one of the most aggressive field isolates. The circular mitochondrial genome is 53,646 bp long with GC content of 34.27%, and encodes 14 common protein genes, 23 tRNA and two rRNA genes, and ten introns. Forty-five SNPs and InDels also were identified during comparative analyses with another isolate. The mitochondrial genome sequence provides a useful resource for developing molecular markers for pathogen detection, and improvement of control strategies for the disease.