Skip to main content
ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Pullman, Washington » Grain Legume Genetics Physiology Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #375051

Research Project: Developing Abiotic and Biotic Stress-Resilient Edible Legume Production Systems through Directed GxExM Research

Location: Grain Legume Genetics Physiology Research

Title: Fusarium. In: Compendium of Pea Diseases and Pests

Author
item PASCHE, J - NORTH DAKOTA STATE UNIVERSITY
item GOSSEN, B - AGRICULTURE AND AGRI-FOOD CANADA
item Porter, Lyndon

Submitted to: American Phytopathological Society Press
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/17/2020
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Fusarium root rot was first described as a serious disease of pea in North America and Europe a century ago and has become an important root disease across irrigated and non-irrigated pea-producing areas of North America. Yield losses of over 50% have been reported. Fusarium root rot is often associated with multiple diseases constituting a major root rot complex. Fusarium solani and Fusarium avenaceum are considered to be two of the most problematic Fusarium species causing infection. Infections often occur near the seed attachment area of the below ground stem. The infection can cause reddish-brown to blackish lesions on the below ground root system, but infected tissue usually is not visible above the soil line. Chlamydospores are the main survival spores in soil. Soil compaction, soil temperatures exceeding 30C, limited soil moisture, nematodes, pHs above 7.5 or below 5.1, poor soil fertility, herbicide injury, or poor seed vigor all can contribute to increased Fusarium root rot disease severity. Currently no commercial pea cultivars are highly resistant to Fusarium pathogens. However, for F. solani, moderate resistance is available. Seed treatments can prevent or limit seed infection due to Fusaria, but none currently provide season long root rot protection.

Technical Abstract: Fusarium root rot was first described as a serious disease of pea in North America and Europe a century ago and has become an important root disease across irrigated and non-irrigated pea-producing areas of North America. Yield losses of over 50% have been reported. Fusarium root rot is often associated with multiple diseases constituting a major root rot complex. Fusarium solani and Fusarium avenaceum are considered to be two of the most problematic Fusarium species causing infection. Infections often occur near the seed attachment area of the below ground stem. The infection can cause reddish-brown to blackish lesions on the below ground root system, but infected tissue usually is not visible above the soil line. Chlamydospores are the main survival spores in soil. Soil compaction, soil temperatures exceeding 30C, limited soil moisture, nematodes, pHs above 7.5 or below 5.1, poor soil fertility, herbicide injury, or poor seed vigor all can contribute to increased Fusarium root rot disease severity. Currently no commercial pea cultivars are highly resistant to Fusarium pathogens. However, for F. solani, moderate resistance is available. Seed treatments can prevent or limit seed infection due to Fusaria, but none currently provide season long root rot protection.