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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Ithaca, New York » Robert W. Holley Center for Agriculture & Health » Emerging Pests and Pathogens Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #373517

Research Project: Characterization of Molecular Networks in Diseases Caused by Emerging and Persistent Bacterial Plant Pathogens

Location: Emerging Pests and Pathogens Research

Title: Complete genome sequence resource for the necrotrophic plant-pathogenic bacterium Dickeya dianthicola 67-19 isolated from New Guinea Impatiens

Author
item LIU, YINGYU - Cornell University - New York
item Helmann, Tyler
item Stodghill, Paul
item Filiatrault, Melanie

Submitted to: Plant Disease
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/14/2020
Publication Date: 10/16/2020
Citation: Liu, Y., Helmann, T.C., Stodghill, P., Filiatrault, M.J. 2020. Complete genome sequence resource for the necrotrophic plant-pathogenic bacterium Dickeya dianthicola 67-19 isolated from New Guinea Impatiens. Plant Disease. Published Online. https://doi.org/10.1094/PDIS-09-20-1968-A.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1094/PDIS-09-20-1968-A

Interpretive Summary: Dickeya dianthicola causes blackleg and soft rot in a wide variety of field and ornamental crops. These diseases cause significant economic loss in the US and around the world. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of D. dianthicola 67-19, which was originally isolated from New Guinea Impatiens in Long Island, NY. This sequence and its annotation are now publicly available and are being used to help better understand blackleg and soft rot diseases in impatiens and other specialty crops, such as potatoes.

Technical Abstract: New Guinea Impatiens (NGI, Impatiens hawkeri) are popular bedding plants. Using 16S rDNA sequencing and genus-specific PCR, we previously reported Dickeya dianthicola strain 67-19 causing blackleg symptoms on NGI. Here, we report a high-quality complete and annotated genome sequence of D. dianthicola 67-19. The 4,851,809'bp genome was assembled with Nanopore reads and polished with Illumina reads, yielding 422× and 105× coverage, respectively. This closed genome provides a resource for future research on comparative genomics and biology of D. dianthicola and related species.