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ARS Home » Midwest Area » East Lansing, Michigan » Sugarbeet and Bean Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #372040

Research Project: Utilizing Genetic Diversity within Phaseolus vulgaris to Develop Dry Beans with Enhanced Functional Properties

Location: Sugarbeet and Bean Research

Title: Root crown response to fungal root rot in Phaseolus vulgaris Middle American x Andean lines

Author
item HAUS, MIRANDA - Michigan State University
item WANG, WEIJIA - Michigan State University
item JACOBS, JANETTE - Michigan State University
item PEPLINSKI, HANNAH - Michigan State University
item CHILVERS, MARTIN - Michigan State University
item BUELL, ROBIN - Michigan State University
item Cichy, Karen

Submitted to: Plant Disease
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/18/2020
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Fusarium root rot (FRR) is a major disease of common beans. Developing varieties with resistance to FRR causing pathogens has been challenging. Another potential approach is to develop bean varieties with root systems better able to cope with the disease. The goal of this research was to evaluate the relationships between root traits and FRR disease symptoms. A set of related bean lines were evaluated for root system characteristics and FRR disease symptoms. The study was conducted at three Michigan field sites, including one field with artificially increased Fusarium brasiliense disease pressure. Basal root number and adventitious root distribution were factors associated with reduced disease severity.

Technical Abstract: Fusarium root rot (FRR) is a global limiter of dry bean production. In common bean and other legumes, resistance to FRR is related to root development and root architecture, which provides a complementary breeding strategy for FRR resistance. Here, we describe the relationships between root traits and FRR disease symptoms. Using ‘shovelomics’ techniques, a subset of recombinant inbred lines was phenotyped for root architecture traits and disease symptoms across three Michigan fields, including one field with artificially increased Fusarium brasiliense disease pressure. Correlation matrices of root traits differed between resistant and susceptible lines with basal root number and adventitious root distribution being important factors in reduction of disease severity. These data demonstrate that at early growth stages, root architecture is a component of resistance to FRR, and may be a phenotype to incorporate in breeding for FRR resistance.