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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Corvallis, Oregon » National Clonal Germplasm Repository » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #370305

Research Project: Management of Temperate-Adapted Fruit, Nut, and Specialty Crop Genetic Resources and Associated Information

Location: National Clonal Germplasm Repository

Title: Guardians of the germplasm: hazelnuts, berries, pears, hops, and mint

Author
item Hummer, Kim
item POSTMAN, JOSEPH - Retired ARS Employee

Submitted to: Journal of American Pomological Society
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/21/2019
Publication Date: 4/1/2020
Citation: Hummer, K.E., Postman, J. 2020. Guardians of the germplasm: hazelnuts, berries, pears, hops, and mint. Journal of American Pomological Society. 74(2):104-110.

Interpretive Summary: The NCGR-Corvallis is one of about 20 federal facilities and worksites in the U.S. National Plant Germplasm System dedicated to preserving economically important crops and their wild relatives. This genebank opened in May 1981, through a congressional funding mandate of the U.S. Department of Agriculture to conserve hazelnuts, strawberries, hops, mint, pears, currants/gooseberries, raspberries/blackberries, blueberries/cranberries, and other crops. The unit collects, maintains, distributes, and evaluates genetic resources for these crops. The collection now includes more than 12,000 accessions. About half are living plants and the rest are seedlots. Clonal collections are conserved in orchards and as containerized plants under screen or in greenhouses. Seeds are stored in freezers at -20o C. These living plant collections are some of the most extensive in the world for each genus, and represent heritage cultivars as well as diverse wild species. Since 1981, the NCGR has annually distributed between 6,000 and 10,000 samples (cuttings, plants or seeds) to plant breeders and researchers around the world. The objective of this manuscript is to provide examples of significant plant introductions (PIs) that are conserved at NCGR-Corvallis. Over the past decade, operational funds have been limited and administrative costs have increased. New diseases and pests have expanded their ranges.

Technical Abstract: The NCGR-Corvallis is one of about 20 federal facilities and worksites in the U.S. National Plant Germplasm System dedicated to preserving economically important crops and their wild relatives. This genebank opened in May 1981, through a congressional funding mandate of the U.S. Department of Agriculture to conserve hazelnuts, strawberries, hops, mint, pears, currants/gooseberries, raspberries/blackberries, blueberries/cranberries, and other crops. The unit collects, maintains, distributes, and evaluates genetic resources for these crops. The collection now includes more than 12,000 accessions. About half are living plants and the rest are seedlots. Clonal collections are conserved in orchards and as containerized plants under screen or in greenhouses. Seeds are stored in freezers at -20o C. These living plant collections are some of the most extensive in the world for each genus, and represent heritage cultivars as well as diverse wild species. Since 1981, the NCGR has annually distributed between 6,000 and 10,000 samples (cuttings, plants or seeds) to plant breeders and researchers around the world. The objective of this manuscript is to provide examples of significant plant introductions (PIs) that are conserved at NCGR-Corvallis. Over the past decade, operational funds have been limited and administrative costs have increased. New diseases and pests have expanded their ranges.