Skip to main content
ARS Home » Southeast Area » Fort Pierce, Florida » U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory » Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #369866

Research Project: IPM Methods for Insect Pests of Orchard Crops

Location: Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research

Title: Cross-infectivity of Vorticella across genera of mosquitoes for development of biological mosquito control strategies

Author
item DURDEN, SHELBY - University Of Florida
item CRUZ, ANTHONY - University Of Florida
item Hunter, Wayne
item DEBBOUN, MUSTAPHA - Harris County Public Health & Environmental Services
item DUGMA, DAGNE - University Of Florida

Submitted to: bioRxiv
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/29/2019
Publication Date: 10/29/2019
Citation: Durden, S., Cruz, A., Hunter, W.B., Debboun, M., Dugma, D. 2019. Cross-infectivity of Vorticella across genera of mosquitoes for development of biological mosquito control strategies. bioRxiv. https://doi.org/10.1101/822536.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1101/822536

Interpretive Summary: Protozoans in general comprise about one-third of the known parasites infecting arthropod vectors. Studies have shown that exposure of Paramecium ciliate protists, like Vorticella species, reduces larvae growth and survival in mosquitoes, Aedes and Anopheles species (Diptera). The Vorticella parasite isolated from Aedes aegyptii, was shown to successfully parasitize two Culex species of mosquito (Culex nigripalpus and Culex quinquefasciatus), with similar negative effects. This report identifies the capacity of a Vorticella protozoan’s ability to cross-infect multiple mosquito host species. Vorticella may provide a natural biological control agent to reduce mosquito populations.

Technical Abstract: Protozoans in general comprise about one-third of the known parasites infecting arthropod vectors. Studies have shown that exposure of Paramecium ciliate protists, like Vorticella species, reduces larvae growth and survival in mosquitoes, Aedes and Anopheles species (Diptera). The Vorticella parasite isolated from Aedes aegyptii, was shown to infect two Culex species (Culex nigripalpus and Culex quinquefasciatus) resulting in reduced larvae growth, survival and body weights of the emerging adults. The Vorticella competes for food resources like bacteria and other microbes in the environment that are essential to mosquito growth and survival. This report shows that this Vorticella protozoan has the ability to cross-infect multiple mosquito species larvae (from Aedes to Culex species). Vorticella may provide a natural biological control agent to reduce mosquito populations.