Skip to main content
ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Wapato, Washington » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #369179

Title: Spotted lanternfly risk regions mapped

Author
item Neven, Lisa
item Wakie, Tewodros
item Yee, Wee

Submitted to: Good Fruit Grower
Publication Type: Trade Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/1/2019
Publication Date: 2/1/2020
Citation: Neven, L.G., Wakie, T., Yee, W.L. 2020. Spotted lanternfly risk regions mapped. Good Fruit Grower. 71:3;16-17.

Interpretive Summary: Native to China, the spotted lanternfly is a planthopper that feeds on more than 70 plant species, including grape, hops, apple, pear, cherry, maple, and walnut. It damages plants by sucking sap from all parts of the plants, exuding honeydew on the plants, and aiding mold growth. The detection of this pest in the eastern United States and its potential economic damage on the tree fruit industry prompted personnel at the USDA-ARS lab in Wapato, WA to investigate whether this pest could establish in the State. Results indicate that highly suitable habitats are found in Benton, Franklin, Yakima, Walla Walla, and Klickitat Counites. The potential distribution of spotted lanternfly in WA closely matched that of the distribution of the tree-of-heaven, the invasive plant from China. Proactive measures including control of tree-of-heaven are needed to prevent the introduction of this pest in WA.

Technical Abstract: Native to China, the spotted lanternfly is a planthopper that feeds on more than 70 plant species, including grape, hops, apple, pear, cherry, maple, and walnut. It damages plants by sucking sap from all parts of the plants, exuding honeydew on the plants, and aiding mold growth. The detection of this pest in the eastern United States and its potential economic damage on the tree fruit industry prompted personnel at the USDA-ARS lab in Wapato, WA to investigate whether this pest could establish in the State. Results indicate that highly suitable habitats are found in Benton, Franklin, Yakima, Walla Walla, and Klickitat Counites. The potential distribution of spotted lanternfly in WA closely matched that of the distribution of the tree-of-heaven, the invasive plant from China. Proactive measures including control of tree-of-heaven are needed to prevent the introduction of this pest in WA.