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ARS Home » Plains Area » Clay Center, Nebraska » U.S. Meat Animal Research Center » Nutrition and Environmental Management Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #368496

Research Project: Improve Nutrient Management and Efficiency of Beef Cattle and Swine

Location: Nutrition and Environmental Management Research

Title: Ruminal transcript abundance of the centromere-associated protein E gene may influence residual feed intake in beef steers

Author
item RATHERT, A - University Of Missouri
item MEYER, A - University Of Missouri
item FOOTE, ANDREW - Former ARS Employee
item KERN, R - Ward Laboratories
item CUNNINGHAM-HOLLINGER, H - University Of Wyoming
item Kuehn, Larry
item Lindholm-Perry, Amanda

Submitted to: Animal Genetics
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/10/2020
Publication Date: 6/1/2020
Citation: Rathert, A.R., Meyer, A.M., Foote, A.P., Kern, R.J., Cunningham-Hollinger, H.C., Kuehn, L.A., Lindholm-Perry, A.K. 2020. Ruminal transcript abundance of the centromere-associated protein E gene may influence residual feed intake in beef steers. Animal Genetics. 51(3):453-456. https://doi.org/10.1111/age.12926.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/age.12926

Interpretive Summary: A better understanding of the cellular mechanisms of the rumen to process feed may assist us in identifying and evaluating animals with superior feed efficiency. Studies to determine which genes are expressed differently in the rumen tissue from feed efficient and feed inefficiency beef steers have previously been performed. Continuing this research is critical to determine whether the expression of these same genes is associated with feed efficiency in other populations of beef cattle to ensure they are robust across breed and environment. A previous rumen-transcriptome study on Hereford x Angus steers identified 122 differentially expressed genes (PFDR<0.05) associated with residual feed intake (RFI), a measure of feed efficiency. The purpose of our study was to test the most up- and down-regulated genes in the rumen tissue of an unrelated population of Angus x Hereford steers that included two contemporary groups. The expression of a total of thirteen genes were evaluated. The centromere protein E (CENPE) gene was expressed in lower concentrations in the rumen epithelium of steers in the low RFI group in both of the contemporary groups of animals in this study, which mirrored the expression in the previous study. CENPE, a gene involved in chromosome alignment during mitosis, has previously been associated with growth traits in cattle and pigs. There was no relationship detected between the expression of the other 12 genes tested with RFI in our population of steers, which illustrates the importance of testing gene expression data in additional populations.

Technical Abstract: A better understanding regarding the mechanisms by which the rumen processes feed may assist us in identifying animals with superior feed efficiency. Studies to evaluate the gene expression of rumen tissue have previously been performed to analyze their relationship with feed efficiency. Continuing this research is critical to determine whether the expression of the genes identified is associated with feed efficiency in additional populations of beef cattle to ensure that they are robust across breed and environment. A previous rumen transcriptome study on Hereford 9 Angus steers identified 122 differentially expressed genes (PFDR < 0.05) associated with residual feed intake (RFI), a measure of feed efficiency. The purpose of our study was to test the most divergent, up- and down-regulated genes in the rumen tissue of an unrelated population of Hereford 9 Angus steers that included two contemporary groups. A total of 13 genes were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. The centromere-associated protein E (CENPE) gene was expressed in lower concentrations in the rumen epithelium of steers in the more efficient (low RFI) group in both contemporary groups of animals, which was the same as the previous study. In addition, CENPE, a gene involved in chromosome alignment during mitosis, has also been associated with growth traits in cattle and pigs. There was no relationship between the expression of the other 12 genes tested with RFI in the population of steers in this study, which illustrates the importance of validating gene expression data in additional populations.