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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BHNRC) » Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center » Diet, Genomics and Immunology Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #367327

Research Project: Elucidating Phytonutrient Bioavailability, Health Promoting Effects and Mechanisms of Existing/Emerging Foods and Beverages

Location: Diet, Genomics and Immunology Laboratory

Title: Effects of rice with different amounts of resistant starch on mice fed a high-fat diet: attenuation of adipose weight gain

Author
item WAN, JIAWEI - Huazhong University Of Science And Technology
item WU, YANBEI - Beijing Advanced Innovation Center For Food Nutrition And Human Health, Beijing Technology & Busine
item Pham, Quynhchi
item YU, LIANGLI - University Of Maryland
item Chen, Ming-Hsuan
item Boue, Stephen
item Yokoyama, Wallace - Wally
item LI, BIN - Huazhong University Of Science And Technology
item Wang, Thomas - Tom

Submitted to: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/26/2019
Publication Date: 11/7/2019
Citation: Wan, J., Wu, Y., Pham, Q., Yu, L., Chen, M., Boue, S.M., Yokoyama, W.H., Li, B., Wang, T.T. 2019. Effects of rice with different amounts of resistant starch on mice fed a high-fat diet: attenuation of adipose weight gain. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.jafc.9b05505.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.jafc.9b05505

Interpretive Summary: Increasing the amount of resistant starch (RS) in the diet may confer protective effects against chronic diseases. Rice, a good dietary source of carbohydrates, also contains RS. However, it remains unclear if RS at the amount consumed in cooked rice has a health benefit. To address the question, we examined the effects of cooked rice containing different levels of RS in a diet-induced obesity rodent model. Rice containing RS as low as 1.07% attenuated adipose weight and adipocyte size gain, induced by a moderately high-fat (HF) diet which correlated with lower leptin levels in plasma and adipose tissue. RS in rice at 8.61% increased fecal short chain fatty acid (SCFA) levels, modulated HF diet-induced expression of adipose triglyceride metabolism and inflammatory genes and increased triglyceride excretion in feces. Hence, including rice with RS level at = 1.07% may attenuate risks associated with consumption of a moderately high-fat diet. This study provides novel information on the amount of RS, rice varietal and prevention of obesity. The information will benefit basic, translational scientists, as well as farmers and consumers who are interested in high RS rice for health promotion.

Technical Abstract: Increasing the amount of resistant starch (RS) in the diet may confer protective effects against chronic diseases. Rice, a good dietary source of carbohydrates, also contains RS. However, it remains unclear if RS at the amount consumed in cooked rice has a health benefit. To address the question, we examined the effects of cooked rice containing different levels of RS in a diet-induced obesity rodent model. Rice containing RS as low as 1.07% attenuated adipose weight and adipocyte size gain, induced by a moderately high-fat (HF) diet which correlated with lower leptin levels in plasma and adipose tissue. RS in rice at 8.61% increased fecal short chain fatty acid (SCFA) levels, modulated HF diet-induced expression of adipose triglyceride metabolism and inflammatory genes and increased triglyceride excretion in feces. Hence, including rice with RS level at = 1.07% may attenuate risks associated with consumption of a moderately high-fat diet.