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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Stuttgart, Arkansas » Dale Bumpers National Rice Research Center » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #366244

Research Project: Gene Discovery and Crop Design for Current and New Rice Management Practices and Market Opportunities

Location: Dale Bumpers National Rice Research Center

Title: Identifying genomic regions influencing variations in inorganic arsenic accumulation in rice cultivars

Author
item Fernandez-Baca, Cristina
item Codling, Eton
item Reddy, Vangimalla
item Pinson, Shannon
item McClung, Anna
item McClung, Anna
item Barnaby, Jinyoung

Submitted to: Mid Atlantic Plant and Molecular Biology Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/12/2019
Publication Date: 8/14/2019
Citation: Fernandez-Baca, C.P., Codling, E.E., Reddy, V., Pinson, S.R., McClung, A.M., Barnaby, J.Y. 2019. Identifying genomic regions influencing variations in inorganic arsenic accumulation in rice cultivars. 36th Annual Mid Atlantic Plant and Molecular Biology Society. Poster #3.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Consumption of rice containing levels of arsenic (As) is linked to adverse health impacts including cancer. Limits have been placed on inorganic As (iAs) content in milled rice. For example, the FAO/CODEX limit for iAs is 200 ppb, and the FDA limit is 100 ppb in rice-based infant food. Rice accumulates As as a result of being typically grown under flooded field conditions. Management (M) practices such as alternate wetting and drying (AWD) for growing rice is popular as a means to save water and reduce rice grain As concentrations. A chromosome segment substitution line (CSSL) mapping the population of TeQing-into-Lemont introgression lines (TILs) displaying the contrasting grain inorganic arsenic accumulation was used to identify genomic regions controlling iAs accumulation in rice grain, which can better inform future breeding efforts of low iAs accumulating varieties. 123 TILs were grown under continuously flooded and alternately wet and dried fields in Stuttgart, Arkansas over a two year period. Grain iAs contents were measured from harvested samples from the 2 irrigation treatments. Measured grain iAs concentrations were used to identify 7 QTLs impacting grain iAs accumulation using sequence-based SNPs. Identification of inorganic As QTLs can guide future breeding efforts to develop low iAs accumulating rice cultivar alternatives for farmers. Ultimately, this research can result in a reduction of iAs exposure from rice consumption.